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McGraw, Urban, Bryan headline new fest

Tuesday, February 12, 2019 – Hometown Rising, the first-ever country music and bourbon Festival, will make its debut in September as a two-day festival featuring Tim McGraw, Keith Urban, Little Big Town and Luke Bryan in Louisville.

The festival debuts Saturday, Sept. 14 and Sunday, Sept. 15 at Highland Festival Grounds at KY Expo Center.

Other artists performing include Dwight Yoakam, Brett Young, Jake Owen, Bret Michaels and Frankie Ballard. More than 30 artists will play on three stages, including two side-by-side main stages, over the course of the weekend.

Tickets go on sale Friday, Feb. 15 at noon eastern.

"I am beyond thrilled to be playing the very first year of Hometown Rising, and to have the opportunity to be part of such a prestigious and eclectic lineup of modern country artists," said performer Alice Wallace.

Festival producer Danny Wimmer said, "Hometown Rising is a blend of the music and culture I grew up around, in a place I now consider a second home. While DWP (Wimmer's company) is best known for our rock festivals, I was surrounded by country music growing up in Jacksonville, Fla., and I'm excited to be expanding our portfolio with a genre and a place that are both close to my heart. I can't think of a better location to launch a country music festival than right here in bourbon country. Mayor Fischer and the Louisville community continue to be great partners as we take this next step in the marriage of great music, food and bourbon."

The current music lineup for Hometown Rising is:

Saturday, September 14: Tim McGraw, Little Big Town, Dwight Yoakam, [artist TBA], Frankie Ballard, The Cadillac Three, Jimmie Allen, Lindsay Ell, The Steel Woods, Clare Dunn, Gabby Barrett, Kassi Ashton, J.D. Shelburne, Raelyn Nelson Band, Alice Wallace, Imaj

Sunday, September 15: Luke Bryan, Keith Urban, Brett Young, Jake Owen, Bret Michaels, Lauren Alaina, LoCash, Drake White and The Big Fire, The Wild Feathers, Mason Ramsey, Noah Guthrie, Everette, Lauren Jenkins, Jeffrey East, Hannah Ellis, Kendall Shaffer

Bourbon authority and author Fred Minnick is the festival's official spirits curator and has helped assemble onsite experiences, including bourbon tastings and workshops for fans 21+ during Bourbon Heritage Month.

More news for Tim McGraw

CD reviews for Tim McGraw

Damn Country Music CD review - Damn Country Music
Tim McGraw said of his 14th studio album, "Damn Country Music," "It's is all about passion, (taking him back to 1989) "when I came to Nashville to chase my dreams." Country music has richly rewarded him over the past two decades, and he honors the genre's tradition here. The album gets off to a very traditional start with Celtic folk. The flute and skillful acoustic picking on the opener "Here Tonight" bring a Mark Knopfler tune immediately to mind. »»»
Sundown Heaven Town CD review - Sundown Heaven Town
The banjo comes first out of the speakers, the opening strains of "Overrated," the lead-off song on Tim McGraw's latest. But with a "1-2-3-4" count, the mood changes and goes for a more modern country approach. McGraw does about the same on the follow-up "City Lights" with Michael Landau's steely, but rocking lead guitar taking over near the conclusion as it does later hard on "Sick of Me" where the protagonist contemplates a need to turn his life around. »»»
Two Lanes of Freedom CD review - Two Lanes of Freedom
Tim McGraw's debut on Big Machine, "Two Lanes Of Freedom" is his first record since the announcement that he gave up alcohol five years ago and the first since his acrimonious, litigious split from the only label he had ever known, Curb. The new CD literally and symbolically represents a fresh start. If only the material better reflected his new take on life. What is presented here is about as boiler plate as contemporary country gets. The album is a safe play and takes almost no chances. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Henry comes out the other end a better man – Joe Henry mentioned at the outset that this show was not only the record release celebration, but also the anniversary - to the day - of when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer. Although the songs from this fine new album do not address his illness directly, they many times touch upon the big issues of human existence (life, death and the meaning of it all).... »»»
Concert Review: What's in a name? Strings lives up to it – Billy Strings may not be his real name, but the bluegrass performer more than lives up to his adopted moniker. Bluegrass may not be the first style of music when one thinks of William Apostol's (yup, that's Billy's real name) home state of Michigan, but with more miles on the bus and shows like this outstanding, lengthy, lyrical night... »»»
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