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Moorer gets personal on "Blood"

Monday, August 19, 2019 – Allison Moorer will replace "Blood," an album that is a companion piece to a forthcoming memoir, on Oct. 25.

The album, due onAutotelic Records / Thirty Tigers, is Moorer's first solo album in four years.

Moorer is also putting out "Blood: A Memoir," on Oct. 29 through Da Capo Press, an imprint of Hachette Books. The book is a detailed account of Moorer and her sister's (Grammy Award winner Shelby Lynne) childhood growing up in a troubled home in southern Alabama, which ended with the murder-suicide of her parents in 1986.

Moorer had avoided going into the details of the abuse, alcoholism, intimidation, poverty

The CD contains 10 tracks that directly connect to the people, emotions, trauma and state of mind that are all detailed in the memoir. Shortly after their parents passing, Shelby Lynne found the unfinished lyrics to a song in their father's briefcase, which she wrote the music for. "I'm The One To Blame," recorded bare, with only Moorer's vocal and acoustic guitar, is a powerfully moving confessional. Moorer addresses depression and heartbreak ("Bad Weather"), terrified young sisters clinging to each other for support ("Nightlight"), the deep rooted character of their mother ("The Rock And The Hill"), unfulfilled voids that resides within ("All I Wanted") and the emotional finish line she hopes to reach one day ("Heal").

In 1999, Moorer penned "Cold Cold Earth", a song about her parent's last hours on earth, but did not release it then. Her long time producer Kenny Greenberg, who produced "Blood," convinced her to release it as an unlisted hidden track on the album "The Hardest Part" (2000). Moorer chose to reclaim the song on "Blood" and officially reveal it to the public.

More news for Allison Moorer

CD reviews for Allison Moorer

Down to Believing CD review - Down to Believing
Allison Moorer's eighth studio album may be her finest yet; her voice rings clear, soaring on the tender ballads of loss and fiercely raging through the rockers that name the ongoing struggles we all face as we maneuver in and around the vagaries of love, failure, momentary hope and disillusion. Moorer joins forces with her old producer Kenny Greenberg, who also plays electric guitar on several songs and co-wrote the title track, and though it took them two years to record the album, it was worth the wait. »»»
Crows CD review - Crows
Allison Moorer is known as much for her own material as she is for her family in sister Shelby Lynne and hubby Steve Earle. However, here, Moorer seems to move from previous Americana albums for a haunting, jazz-accented approach on the opener Abalone Sky. Think of Cowboy Junkies' Margo Timmins fronting a seasoned jazz trio, and you should get the picture for that tune and especially the engaging Should I Be Concerned. And it's a very good idea, which sets things off on the right foot. »»»
Mockingbird CD review - Mockingbird
Labeling this merely a covers album is selling the talented Allison Moorer short; this Buddy Miller-produced collection of interpreted songs is both a respectful tribute to the female songwriting genre and a testament to Moore's own vocal prowess. A gifted songwriter herself - the self-penned title track is among the best on the disc - the song selections reflect Moorer's own eclectic influences, ranging from Ma Rainey to Patti Smith to Chan Marshall (aka Cat Power). »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Turner pleases the traditionalists – Josh Turner is a hard-working citizen, a man of faith and a loyal father and husband. He also happens to be one of the youngest members inducted to the Grand Ole Opry. In short, he is the embodiment of country music's champion of the everyman. This night was special for him. He was celebrating an anniversary with his wife and his 18th with his label MCA.... »»»
Concert Review: Not much really changes for LaFarge – Just one look at the stage made it clear that this was not going to be a typical night with Pokey LaFarge. There were only a few guitars to be seen, which meant that LaFarge was going it alone. "I've been touring for years with a band," LaFarge told perhaps a few hundred people before he had even played a note.... »»»
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