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Former Bill Anderson drummer Snuffy Miller dies

Wednesday, June 25, 2008 – Len "Snuffy" Miller, who was the drummer in Bill Anderson's original Po' Boys band was found dead in his Nashville home yesterday afternoon. He was in his 60s. The cause of death was unknown.

Anderson gave Miller the nickname "because of his nervous habits when we would travel. In those days, we rode to our concert dates in cars, and Snuffy was always afraid we were going to have an accident. 'Look out!"' he would constantly yell at whomever was driving, 'that car's gonna pull out in front of us and we're all gonna be snuffed out'."

"I finally heard 'snuffed out' one too many times. 'Len, if you say that one more time, when we go onstage tonight I'm going to introduce you as 'Snuff Miller,' I threatened. He did' and I did, and from that moment on nobody ever called him Len again."

Anderson described Miller as a "a big fan favorite on our road shows because he was so animated and so naturally funny. The wacky nickname didn't hurt either. But Snuffy also possessed a good singing voice, and just when the audiences would think he was the funniest man they ever saw, he would launch into a serious song and leave them breathless."

Miller played with Anderson for six years. He played on his own and later drummed for Dottie West and Nat Stuckey. He also produced records, including comedy albums for the late Jerry Clower.

Miller left music and became a bus driver for the Nashville Sounds Triple A baseball team.

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The Way I Feel CD review - The Way I Feel
Though Whisperin' Bill Anderson had an impressive run of hits in the 1960s, lately he has been best known as a songwriter, penning hits for Kenny Chesney and Brad Paisley. Anderson's own version of "Whiskey Lullaby," Paisley's hit duet with Alison Krauss, is included here, though Anderson's delivery isn't quite as haunting without Krauss' accompaniment. Anderson has earned another lease on his creative life mostly through writing with younger artists, and he continues that trend here with, "Cold »»»
A Lot Of Things Different
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Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Jarosz brings the cheer – Sarah Jarosz justifiably was in good spirits. After all, she just released her brand new "Undercurrent" disc about 10 days prior. And she was coming home in a way as she went to college in the Boston area. Plus, she packed the club in a near sell-out gig. The good cheer extended to her music as well in a varied, change-it-up set that... »»»
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