Sign up for newsletter
 

Country Music DJ Hall announces inductees

Monday, October 20, 2008 – Chuck Collier and Gerry House will be inducted into the Country Music DJ Hall of Fame, while Bob McKay and Moon Mullins are the Country Music Radio Hall of Fame inductees, it was announced Monday. The group will be officially instated March 3, 2009 at the Nashville Convention Center.

"The 2009 Hall of Fame class is a stellar list of radio professionals who perfectly match the criteria for the Country DJ and Radio Halls of fame," said R&R Country Editor and Chairman of the Country Music DJ and Radio Hall of Fame R.J. Curtis. "Each has made a 'significant contribution to the growth and development of country radio.' On behalf of CRB, I'm proud to welcome these four deserving inductees to their rightful place."

Collier has spent more than 30 years in the country format and more than 36 years at WGAR (Cleveland). His radio career began in 1963 at WSRW (Hillsboro, Ohio) and includes positions with WMWM (Wilmington, Ohio), WONE (Dayton, Ohio), WSAI (Cincinnati) and WCBS (New York). In 2005, Collier was inducted into the Radio-TV Broadcasters' Hall of Fame of Ohio. In 2007, he was honored with the National Association of Broadcasters' Marconi Award for Large Market Personality of the Year. He currently serves as Music Director and Afternoon Air Personality at WGAR.

House is among the most decorated country radio personalities of all time. House began his radio career at WBCR (Maryville, Tenn.) but joined WSIX-AM (Nashville) in 1975 and moved to WSIX-FM in the early '80s. In 1985, he moved his show to WSM (Nashville) and then to KLAC (Los Angeles) before returning to WSIX-FM. In 2008, the Gerry House and the House Foundation morning show on WSIX won Personality of the Year awards from the Country Music Association, the Academy of Country Music and Radio & Records. He has also received the National Association of Broadcasters' Marconi Award and Leadership Music's Dale Franklin Award. House is also an accomplished songwriter, having written "The Big One" (George Strait), "Little Rock" (Reba McEntire) and "On The Side Of Angels" (LeAnn Rimes).

McKay has programmed country stations in major markets for more than three decades. His career started in 1965 at Armed Forces Radio before becoming the evening air personality at WKY (Oklahoma City, Okla.). He also held positions at WIXZ (Cleveland) and WDAE (Tampa Bay). In 1975, he took his first programming job as Assistant PD and Morning Air Personality of KRKE (Albuquerque, N.M.), followed by positions at KQEO and KLEO (Wichita, Kan.). In 1978, he became Program Director at WBCS (Milwaukee) and was hired in 1980 to switch San Diego Top 40 station KCBQ to the country format. In 1984 he was hired as Program Director of WKIS (Miami) before transferring to Beasley Broadcasting's WXTU (Philadelphia) in 2000.

Mullins was named one of country Radio's five most influential programmers in 1988. His radio career began in 1961 at KKAZ (Denver City, Texas) and includes early stops at KLLL (Lubbock, Texas) and KCKN (Kansas City, Mo.). In 1969, he took his first Program Director position at KFDI (Wichita), followed by program director positions at WINN (Louisville), WDAF (Kansas City) and WHN (New York). In 1991, he became a consultant with the Pollack Media Group and in 1994 founded First Track of Nashville, a music research company. He founded the Moon Mullins Co. in 1995 and became Group Country Program Director for the Journal Broadcasting Group in 1999. In 2005, he took a position as Operations Manager for WBKR and WOMI (Owensboro, Ky.) and co-host of the morning show on WBKR.

The Country Music DJ Hall of Fame (founded 1974) is dedicated to the recognition of those individuals who have made significant contributions to the country radio industry over a 25-year period.

Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Evans does one for the fans – The Downey Theatre is a relatively small community venue. Yet, when Sara Evans took its stage, she did so with such confidence and professionalism, you quickly forgot where you were. She gave this small, but loyal, audience an entertaining show that made you wish there were more there to witness it. Evans, who started her musical career extremely... »»»
Concert Review: The Cactus Blossoms move beyond Everlys – The Cactus Blossoms most obvious comparison is the Everly Brothers. Yes, Page Burkum and Jack Torrey are brothers, and they sure sounded like it. But only playing the Everlys card in describing The Cactus Blossoms would have sold them short. While the harmonies played a large role throughout, Torrey enjoyed a number of songs where he was the lead... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Tyminski goes dark Dan Tyminski (known simply as "Tyminski" on his 2017 release "Southern Gothic") has traditional music roots and unassailable bluegrass street cred especially given his membership in Alison Krauss' Union Station. He is also a powerful songwriter and has been writing songs for himself and others for years now.... »»»
Washburn, Fleck create "Echoes" Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn have powerhouse individual talents; each has followed an estimable career path to where they find themselves today: making complex, but spare, records, writing music together and touring with their son Juno. Their new release, "Echoes In The Valley" features mostly songs written by Fleck and Washburn, banjos, Washburn's strong vocals and very little else.... »»»
Hillman bides his time Legends don't come any more legendary than Chris Hillman. The roll call of bands that comprises Hillman's half century in music reads like a wing exhibit at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame; Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers, Manassas, the Souther Hillman Furay Band, the Desert Rose Band,... »»»
The Cadillac Three creates its "Legacy" William Shakespeare noted a few centuries back that a rose by any other name would be equally aromatic, and that general idea has musical implications as well. The Cadillac Three knows a thing or two about maintaining a sonic identity after a name change;... »»»
Mr. Jukebox CD review - Mr. Jukebox
Apparently someone to forgot to tell Joshua Hedley that country music has passed him by. Where does Hedley, aka apparently known as the Mayor of Lower Broad, come off to incorporating honky tonk, Texas swing, western swing and countrypolitan all in the first three songs of his debut?  »»»
Volunteer CD review - Volunteer
Dave Cobb produced "Volunteer" for Old Crow Medicine Show, and while word on the street was that this promised to be a more rocking, less roots music effort, such talk shouldn't dissuade fans of the group's established sound from checking it out.  »»»
The Tree of Forgiveness CD review - The Tree of Forgiveness
Mortality is very much on the mind of John Prine on this, his first album of all-new songs in 13 years. Understandably. After all, this is a man who has survived lung cancer and squamous cell cancer, the latter of which took a toll on his vocal cords. He's also had two knee replacements and a hip replacement. »»»
Paco and Melodic Polaroids CD review - Paco and Melodic Polaroids
Paco is the name of Tim Easton's Gibson J-45, which he bought for $100 and a couple of trade-ins 30 years ago. The name was bestowed on the guitar in Paris by a Deadhead. It's been Easton's best traveling companion and songwriting aid. »»»