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Country Music DJ Hall announces inductees

Monday, October 20, 2008 – Chuck Collier and Gerry House will be inducted into the Country Music DJ Hall of Fame, while Bob McKay and Moon Mullins are the Country Music Radio Hall of Fame inductees, it was announced Monday. The group will be officially instated March 3, 2009 at the Nashville Convention Center.

"The 2009 Hall of Fame class is a stellar list of radio professionals who perfectly match the criteria for the Country DJ and Radio Halls of fame," said R&R Country Editor and Chairman of the Country Music DJ and Radio Hall of Fame R.J. Curtis. "Each has made a 'significant contribution to the growth and development of country radio.' On behalf of CRB, I'm proud to welcome these four deserving inductees to their rightful place."

Collier has spent more than 30 years in the country format and more than 36 years at WGAR (Cleveland). His radio career began in 1963 at WSRW (Hillsboro, Ohio) and includes positions with WMWM (Wilmington, Ohio), WONE (Dayton, Ohio), WSAI (Cincinnati) and WCBS (New York). In 2005, Collier was inducted into the Radio-TV Broadcasters' Hall of Fame of Ohio. In 2007, he was honored with the National Association of Broadcasters' Marconi Award for Large Market Personality of the Year. He currently serves as Music Director and Afternoon Air Personality at WGAR.

House is among the most decorated country radio personalities of all time. House began his radio career at WBCR (Maryville, Tenn.) but joined WSIX-AM (Nashville) in 1975 and moved to WSIX-FM in the early '80s. In 1985, he moved his show to WSM (Nashville) and then to KLAC (Los Angeles) before returning to WSIX-FM. In 2008, the Gerry House and the House Foundation morning show on WSIX won Personality of the Year awards from the Country Music Association, the Academy of Country Music and Radio & Records. He has also received the National Association of Broadcasters' Marconi Award and Leadership Music's Dale Franklin Award. House is also an accomplished songwriter, having written "The Big One" (George Strait), "Little Rock" (Reba McEntire) and "On The Side Of Angels" (LeAnn Rimes).

McKay has programmed country stations in major markets for more than three decades. His career started in 1965 at Armed Forces Radio before becoming the evening air personality at WKY (Oklahoma City, Okla.). He also held positions at WIXZ (Cleveland) and WDAE (Tampa Bay). In 1975, he took his first programming job as Assistant PD and Morning Air Personality of KRKE (Albuquerque, N.M.), followed by positions at KQEO and KLEO (Wichita, Kan.). In 1978, he became Program Director at WBCS (Milwaukee) and was hired in 1980 to switch San Diego Top 40 station KCBQ to the country format. In 1984 he was hired as Program Director of WKIS (Miami) before transferring to Beasley Broadcasting's WXTU (Philadelphia) in 2000.

Mullins was named one of country Radio's five most influential programmers in 1988. His radio career began in 1961 at KKAZ (Denver City, Texas) and includes early stops at KLLL (Lubbock, Texas) and KCKN (Kansas City, Mo.). In 1969, he took his first Program Director position at KFDI (Wichita), followed by program director positions at WINN (Louisville), WDAF (Kansas City) and WHN (New York). In 1991, he became a consultant with the Pollack Media Group and in 1994 founded First Track of Nashville, a music research company. He founded the Moon Mullins Co. in 1995 and became Group Country Program Director for the Journal Broadcasting Group in 1999. In 2005, he took a position as Operations Manager for WBKR and WOMI (Owensboro, Ky.) and co-host of the morning show on WBKR.

The Country Music DJ Hall of Fame (founded 1974) is dedicated to the recognition of those individuals who have made significant contributions to the country radio industry over a 25-year period.

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