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Dixie Chicks sued over West Memphis 3 case

Thursday, December 4, 2008 – The Dixie Chicks were sued for defamation in an Arkansas circuit court because of statements made by lead singer Natalie Maines about the stepfather of one of 3 8-year-old boys murdered in 1993 in a case known as the West Memphis 3.

Steve Branch, Christopher Byers and Michael Moore were found dead May 5, 1993 in a West Memphis, Ark. neighborhood. Damien Echols, Jessie Misskelley and Jason Baldwin, all of West Memphis, were convicted of the murders.

Maines appeared at a Dec. 19, 2007 rally at the Arkansas State Capitol in Little Rock, Ark. in support of those convicted, alleging that Hobbs was involved. She also wrote about the case on the Chicks' web site.

In a Nov. 25 complaint, Terry Hobbs, Branch's stepfather, said Maines wrongfully made a "false and reckless claim that (he) committed the murders of the three boys"

The lawsuit seeks undisclosed punitive damages.

More news for Dixie Chicks

CD reviews for Dixie Chicks

Taking the Long Way CD review - Taking the Long Way
Much has changed on the musical landscape for the Dixie Chicks since the Incident in London three years ago when lead singer Natalie Maines criticized President Bush on the eve of the Iraq war. The trio lost its standing on the country radio scene; their albums were burned, and they received death threats.But Emily Robison, Martie Maguire and Maines do not backpedal on these 14 songs. They, instead, address the issues that have faced them head on time and again. "Not Ready to Make Nice" maintains »»»
Top of the World Tour Live
The Dixie Chicks certainly enjoyed their most controversial year ever thanks to a few words uttered by lead singer Natalie Maines, and they also had one of the most successful tours of 2003 as well. This 22-song live disc recorded somewhere during the U.S. part of the tour is clear indication that beyond the headlines, there was a tremendous amount of quality music going on. The mix put Maines' vocals way out front. She has always been a good singer, and this indicates just how good she truly is. »»»
Home
When The Dixie Chicks talk of going home on their third major label release, that means a return to roots of different sorts in what probably is their best and most consistent album to date. After a break for marriage, baby and a legal confrontation with their record label, The Chicks throw caution to the wind. They make it clear that they're not going to be hitting the pop country button with Darrell Scott's opening "Long Time Gone.," a hit single. Natalie Maines makes ready references to »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Aldean and friends stretch it out, way out – Jason Aldean's tour, "Six String Circus," gets its name from his recent single, "Lights Come On." And titling his tour after a guitar - and more appropriately an electric guitar - makes all the sense in the world. Each act on the bill, which also included A Thousand Horses and Thomas Rhett, use a lot of guitars - but mostly in... »»»
Concert Review: The Jayhawks remain in top form – It's usually a good time to catch a band right after they've released one of their better albums, and "Paging Mr. Proust" is one of The Jayhawks' best. Comprised of smart songs, which consistently put lead singer Gary Louris' engaging vibrato to proper use and instrumental textures that oftentimes stretch the Minnesota act... »»»
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