Sign up for newsletter
 

Tim Easton offers "Porcupine"

Monday, March 2, 2009 – Rootsy musician Tim Easton will be back with his fifth album, "Porcupine," April 28 on New West Records. The Joshua Tree, Cal. resident's sound is rooted in blues, rock and. Easton will be on the road with a band, including a stop in Austin for South By Southwest.

Easton returned to Alex The Great and Club Roar studios in Nashville to work with Brad Jones and Robin Eaton who produced his debut album, Special 20. He wanted to "make some noise and get that jagged, midwestern rock and roll sound again" so he hand-picked the Ohio-based rhythm section - Sam Brown on drums (Gaunt, New Bomb Turks, RJD2) and Matt Surgeson on bass and backing vocals (he also played on Easton's "Special 20"). Guitarist Kenny Vaughn, who Easton met playing in Lucinda Williams' band for her Car Wheels tour, played second guitar.

As for the title, Easton said, "I thought the physical animal called the porcupine was a perfect symbol for the sound of this record in that it appears to be a gentle and harmless creature from a distance but up close it is in fact sharp and potentially dangerous."

Easton previously released 3 albums on New West: "The Truth About Us" (2001), "Break Your Mother's Heart" (2003) and "Ammunition" (2006). He has toured with label mates John Hiatt and The Flatlanders, as well as with The Jayhawks and Lucinda Williams. Living in the village of Joshua Tree between tours has made more time available for other creative endeavours such as painting and writing. "There's not much else to do out here," he said, "so going for long hikes with my dogs or making music, paintings, and stories is what fills my average day at home." A series of 500 individually painted vinyl album jackets will be part of the "Porcupine" release, and the New West CD release will feature Easton's art on the cover.

Tour dates include:
March 18-21 - South By South West including:
Pop Culture Press day party (March 18 at The Dog and Duck Pub)
New West Records day party (March 19 at Club Deville)
Sin City Social Club day party (March 20 at Maria's Tacos)
Ground Control Touring showcase (March 20 at Habana Bar Backyard)
Monday April 27 Fort Wayne, Ind. Brass Rail
Thursday April 30 Chicago, IL The Hideout
Friday May 1 Columbus, Ohio The Rumba Cafe
Saturday May 2 Whitesburg, Ky. Summit City
Sunday May 3 Charleston, West Va. Mountain Stage at Cultural Center Theater
Tuesday May 5 Arlington, Va. IOTA Club and Cafe
Wednesday May 6 New York, The Mercury Lounge 8pm
Thursday May 7 Philadelphia, Johnny Brendas
Friday June 5 Los Angeles, The Mint

CD reviews for Tim Easton

Paco and Melodic Polaroids CD review - Paco and Melodic Polaroids
Paco is the name of Tim Easton's Gibson J-45, which he bought for $100 and a couple of trade-ins 30 years ago. The name was bestowed on the guitar in Paris by a Deadhead. It's been Easton's best traveling companion and songwriting aid. For this occasion, Easton recorded the album in Bristol, Va. via a vintage and portable lathe which cuts a mono signal directly to a lacquer acetate disc, much the way The Carter Family or Jimmie Rodgers made their first records over 90 years ago. »»»
Not Cool CD review - Not Cool
Over the course of his nearly 20-year career, Tim Easton has been steered by both influence and geography; witness the twangy blister of his early mid-Ohio/Midwest days and the Gram Parsons expanse of his Joshua Tree period. Likewise, "Not Cool," Easton's seventh studio album, reflects his move back to the middle of the country as well as his fascination with the legacy of his new Nashville surroundings. Like a classic country album, "Not Cool" clocks in at half an hour »»»
Ammunition CD review - Ammunition
After making inroads with his last album, "Break Your Mother's Heart," singer-songwriter Tim Easton is back with a lovely slab of warm, soothing tracks that eerily brings to mind Dylan. Just check out "C-Dub" and "News Blackout" for proof. In no hurry, songs like "Black Dog" takes on a relaxing tone in the vein of Mark Knopfler while "Oh People" has a light, breezy folksy ramble to it. The same can be said for the shuffling, punchy and fantastic "Not Today." Recorded with little else than an »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Kiah heats up – Amythyst Kiah's music career has seemingly been a slow burn, but that well could be changing. She was part of the quartet that put out the very fine "Songs of Our Native Daughters" earlier this year and is about to launch a tour with CD-mates Rhiannon Giddens, Allison Russell of Birds of Chicago and Leyla McCalla to bring out songs about... »»»
Concert Review: Sweeney maintains her musical integrity – Sunny Sweeney has gone the big label route and even earned a hit with "From a Table Away," but truth be told, she's better off without the baggage of the bigs, especially given the consistent quality and musical vision that was so clearly and admirably on display on this evening. When the East Texas native started her career, she was... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

White embraces "The Hurting Kind" John Paul White, to paraphrase a Steve Earle song, may just be one of the last of the hardcore troubadours. By 'troubadour,' we mean one of those guys that lives to write great songs - more specifically, great country songs - and then get these songs into the ears of folks that... »»»
Bingham gets personal with "American Love Song"...again A lot of the early reviews for "American Love Song," Ryan Bingham's latest set of raucous and reflective Americana brilliance, have characterized it as the singer/ songwriter's most personal album to date.... »»»
Wilson goes her own way After having huge success at the get go with "Redneck Woman," Wilson eventually went her own way and took a break. During her "hiatus," Wilson started her own label and was a "120 percent mom" to her teenage daughter.... »»»
Blue Roses CD review - Blue Roses

Runaway June - Naomi Cooke, Hannah Mulholland and Jennifer Wayne - weave gorgeous harmonies around the lyrics of these songs on their new album, all but four of which they wrote with other writers. »»»

From Another World CD review - From Another World
Following the passing of the late, great James Brown, there are those that have argued that Jim Lauderdale rightfully deserves to inherit the title of the hardest working man in show business. And for good reason. »»»
Breakdown on 20th Ave. South
"Breakdown on 20th Ave. South is significant in a number of ways. For starters, it marks Julie Miller's return to making music after an absence of 10 years. For another, it finds her collaborating once again with her ever prolific  »»»
Ride Me Back Home CD review - Ride Me Back Home
Time may be an enemy to most, but Willie Nelson seems a bit impervious to its ravages - a fact made evident on "Ride Me Back Home," a relaxed affair that showcases Nelson's still-strong voice and his sharp-as-ever songwriting and interpreting abilities. »»»
Close to Home CD review - Close to Home
Honky-tonker Chuck Mead, former leader of the now-traditionalists BR-549, steps out once again for his fourth solo effort, this one recorded in Memphis under acclaimed and current "go-to" roots producer Matt Ross-Spang. »»»
Hard Lessons CD review - Hard Lessons
One would think that Chris Shiflett's two decade stint as guitar foil for Dave Grohl in Foo Fighters would keep him so pathologically busy, he'd barely have time for a real life, let alone an adjunct music career. »»»