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Nail unplugged gig goes live Tuesday

Monday, March 12, 2012 – David Nail becomes the first country artist to be part of Baeblemusic.com's Baeble Sessions series. His unplugged performance - shot in an old-school barbershop in New York City - debuts tomorrow, March 13.

"I wasn't sure what to think when they called," said Nail. "Bands like Foster the People are what they play...and what I do isn't quite in their wheelhouse. But to keep company like that...to put country music with those artists and stretch out what we do, that's the whole idea of what I hope music is about."

With a stripped down band, the Kennett, Missourian's performances of That's How I'll Remember You, Let It Rain and his current single The Sound of A Million Dreams, are interspersed with interview footage that captures tales of Nail going hungry to use his lunch money to buy records and the thrill of singing at Game 7 of the World Series.

As the Baeblemusic.com site says of their choice, "The Missouri artist's songs have a timelessness akin to the Great American Songbook, and beneath his southern twang, an emphasis on the big, bold chorus and universally affecting imagery: rain, the radio, piano keys and human relationships. 'The Sound of a Million Dreams' is almost literal. It speaks to the millions of people feeling Nail's spectrum of emotions all across the continent. Perhaps this is why the music is so appealing; there is something about David Nail's honesty that supersedes being stuck in one genre, place, or time."

"It's not every day I get asked to go to a barber shop to sing rather than get a haircut," Nail said. "But what better place to do something like that than New York City?"

Nail is now on the road with pop singer Gavin DeGraw, where the duo will make a pit stop in Nashville tomorrow, March 13 to play to a sold out house at Marathon Music Works.

Baeblemusic.com is an online destination for live shows, video and commentary from the indie music scene. Founded in 2006, Baeblemusic has a library of exclusive concerts, in-house sessions, and interviews with artists with free online streaming.

More news for David Nail

CD reviews for David Nail

The Fighter CD review - The Fighter
A singer's believability is essential to the success of any album, and David Nail has a way of persuading us that every word he sings on his "Fighter" comes straight from the heart. And it doesn't hurt that the songwriting contained within is topnotch throughout. Two songs, in particular, go straight to the heart in addition to being heartfelt. "Home," which Lori McKenna both sings on and co-wrote, is the first song on this record that will absolutely stop you in your tracks. »»»
I'm a Fire CD review - I'm a Fire
The struggles battling severe depression despite budding success and the adoration of peers and fans alike that David Nail endured during his journey to the recent release of his new album reads something like a country song of its own. And in hindsight, Nail's previous releases were brooding and at times melancholy. Unconscious reflections of his previously undiagnosed condition? Maybe. Nonetheless, the unmistakable positive vibe that shines through his newest album doesn't diminish »»»
The Sound Of A Million Dreams CD review - The Sound Of A Million Dreams
David Nail is a rare mainstream country artist who actually stands out from the rest of Music Row's regulars. Instead of leaning towards one of the two dominant styles of Nashville country, pop or rock, Nail blends country with soul and R&B. When he builds upon his strengths, the songs shine. The single misstep, Grandpa's Farm, sounds like a blend of recent Kid Rock and Dusty Springfield's Son of a Preacher Man; which is as awkward as the comparison sounds. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile goes from excellent to memorable musical event – The last time Brandi Carlile came through town, she was promoting 2018's "By the Way, I Forgive You," which would deservedly go on to win the 2019 Grammy Award for Best Americana Album. This time out, Carlile performed fewer songs from that strong effort, which amounted to a more well-rounded live overview of her career to date.... »»»
Concert Review: Tuttle does well by coming home – Molly Tuttle has won kudos for her acoustic guitar playing. So much so that she's captured the IBMA award for Guitarist of the Year, the first female to win that acclaim from the bluegrass organization. But it's not so much Tuttle's guitar playing that stood out live. Yes, that serves her well for sure. But it's more that her... »»»
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