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Bentley documents life's ups and downs

Monday, February 3, 2014 – A film documenting the ups and downs following the death of Dierks Bentley's father through the birth of his first son - the story that inspired his upcoming seventh studio album "Riser," will be out later this month.

"Dierks Bentley" Riser" can be previewed in a special edit on CMT on Feb. 22 at 2 p.m. eastern. The full length will premiere the same day on Palladia at 9 p.m. eastern. The project will also be available for purchase in the coming weeks. A trailer can be viewed now.

"The two phrases 'touring musician' and 'family man' were never meant to go hand-in-hand...it's just hard. It really hurts your heart to walk out the door on your kids. It's like the two loves of your life pulling at you - your family and your love of music," said Bentley. "I wanted this album to be that deeper look at who I am and who I try to be, and so I guess it's the same with this film too. The first time I watched the rough edit, I actually got physically uncomfortable because it's all in there...my whole life right there on the screen for the whole world to see."

Director Wes Edwards and multiple film crews shadowed Bentley over the course of the last two years, logging thousands of hours of tape, which were edited down by The Moving Pictures Boys (Nashville Docujournal, The Country Club Film) to the most pivotal moments. The film covers everything from the most quiet, pensive moments from Bentley's bunk on the tour bus to the rush of excitement in the delivery room for the birth of his son Knox, and it's all set to the soundtrack of the album that these events inspired.

"I knew Dierks was a dynamic performer and charismatic guy," said Edwards. "But, as a filmmaker, it was a challenge to try and capture a portrait of a guy with so many different aspects to his life. He's a guy who can bring an audience of 20,000 to their feet and a guy you can have a beer with in a dive bar. He's a guy that flies his own plane, but uses a kitchen trash bag for luggage. I hope this documentary accurately captures the Dierks I've had the honor to get to know personally - a guy with serious work ethic, love for his family and genuine respect for the people around him. But most of all, I hope we are able to convey a true artist at work."

Bentley will release his seventh studio album, "Riser," on Feb. 25. He will host screenings over the course of the next few weeks in London, Los Angeles, Nashville, New York and Toronto.

More news for Dierks Bentley

CD reviews for Dierks Bentley

Black CD review - Black
Dierks Bentley seems intent on expanding his musical boundaries, but he may have overreached too much in eschewing where he came from. That most evident by the dominating textured beats. Producer Ross Copperman and Bentley seem hell bent on injecting odd meters and sounds, sharp detours from past efforts. Unfortunately, the atmospheric beats muddy up the vocal delivery on "Freedom," a song that stretches far too long at almost four minutes. Bentley also channels U2 with its »»»
Riser CD review - Riser
Change was in store for Dierks Bentley when it came to recording his seventh album, "Riser." On the personal front, he lost his father and added to his family, clearly affecting the subject matter of his latest. On the musical front, he traded long-time producer Brett Beavers, producer of every disc except "Up on the Ridge," for Ross Copperman, who has enjoyed more success as a writer, including several previous tracks for Bentley. Bentley embraces current trends in country »»»
Up on the Ridge CD review - Up on the Ridge
Dierks Bentley takes a left, turn, sort of, on his fifth studio disc. Bentley has built a solid reputation as a country artist with a slew of hits and catchy songs with edge. But here, Bentley goes bluegrass or at least 12 songs steeped in that sound. This is nothing new for Bentley, who previously has recorded bluegrass songs. Much to his credit, Bentley does not come off as a dilettante, but, instead, someone who feels comfortable with the music from the lead-off title track to the closing sad »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Carlile goes from excellent to memorable musical event – The last time Brandi Carlile came through town, she was promoting 2018's "By the Way, I Forgive You," which would deservedly go on to win the 2019 Grammy Award for Best Americana Album. This time out, Carlile performed fewer songs from that strong effort, which amounted to a more well-rounded live overview of her career to date.... »»»
Concert Review: Tuttle does well by coming home – Molly Tuttle has won kudos for her acoustic guitar playing. So much so that she's captured the IBMA award for Guitarist of the Year, the first female to win that acclaim from the bluegrass organization. But it's not so much Tuttle's guitar playing that stood out live. Yes, that serves her well for sure. But it's more that her... »»»
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