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Lynn, White to join Walk of Fame

Thursday, May 14, 2015 – Loretta Lynn and Jack White will be inducted into the Music City Walk of Fame, Nashville Mayor Karl Dean, joined by Metro Parks and the Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp. announced today.

Lynn and White, who produced Lynn's last disc, "Van Lear Park," will join in the official ribbon-cutting of the newly-renovated Walk of Fame Park at 1 p.m. on Thursday, June 4. The event is free and open to the public.

"I can't think of a better way to celebrate the reopening of Walk of Fame Park than with the induction of Loretta Lynn and Jack White - two very diverse artists," Dean said. "They represent what is best about Nashville with music that spans multiple genres and generations. They are great ambassadors for the creative community in our city, and I congratulate them on this wonderful honor."

In addition to the inductions of Lynn and White, the new plaque design for all of the renovated stars will be unveiled.

"Individually, Loretta Lynn and Jack White have each made an enormous impact on Nashville's music scene," said Ken Levitan, NCVC Board Chair and President of Vector Management. "Collectively, the impact of their collaborations has been felt exponentially and worldwide. The Walk of Fame showcases our diverse history and illustrates to fans from all over the world why we are Music City."

"The improvements at Walk of Fame Park will enable the city to take better advantage of one of the busiest event parks downtown," said Tommy Lynch, director of Metro Parks and Recreation. "The park will feature more usable green space and better electrical and sound capabilities, and it continues to celebrate the Nashville Music Garden, which is home to nearly 300 roses, including some that are very rare."

The Music City Walk of Fame was created in the fall of 2006 on Nashville's Music Mile, a roughly one-mile stretch that connects downtown to Music Row.

The Walk of Fame is a tribute to those from all genres of music who have made significant contributions to preserving the musical heritage of Nashville and have contributed to the world through song or other industry collaboration. With the addition of Lynn and White, the Walk of Fame will have 63 stars. Permanent sidewalk medallions with the artists' name displayed in a star-and-guitar design will be installed in the sidewalk along the Music Mile.

More news for Loretta Lynn

CD reviews for Loretta Lynn

White Christmas Blue CD review - White Christmas Blue
There are some "country" stars that can't seem to make true country music. Then there are artists like Loretta Lynn that can't not create pure country music. Lynn's "White Christmas Blue" album may feel like a Christmas miracle to many traditional country fans. Take Lynn's version of "Away in a Manger," for which Lynn is listed as arranger, for example. It features a lovely Paul Franklin steel guitar solo. "Blue Christmas" is best »»»
Full Circle CD review - Full Circle
Loretta Lynn shows no signs of slowing down at 83. "Full Circle" is her first album since her extremely well-received Jack White-produced "Van Lear Rose," a 2004 masterpiece. Some of the 14 songs on "Full Circle" are new recordings, while a few ("Fist City," "Secret Love" and "Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven") are new versions. Others are old songs ("Black Jack David, "Always On My Mind," "In the Pines") that Lynn »»»
Van Lear Rose
Johnny Cash had his Rick Rubin, and it seems that Loretta Lynn has hers in the form of Jack White of the White Stripes. And that means an album of lots of excellent music with all 13 songs penned by Lynn. Lynn looks to her family past and her own career for inspiration for several songs (the title track, "High on a Mountain Top" about working the coal mines and the "folks know what they've got" and "Story of My Life"). She also isn't afraid to tell off a woman who interfered with her family's »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Rising Appalachia buck the mainsteam, and that's fine with them – Rising Appalachia would not be accused of being in the musical mainstream. Not too many bands who combine folk and Appalachian sounds with new world music could possibly be. And that suits the sister-led duo of Chloe Smith and Leah Song just fine. In fact, at one point, Chloe made it clear she did not embrace radio play as a sign of success... »»»
Concert Review: Bingham plays with something to prove – Ryan Bingham mainly focused on songs from his sixth album "American Love Song," for this lively show. Backed by a supportive band that also included two female backup singers and a fiddler, Bingham's eclectic setlist touched upon country, singer/songwriter folk, rock and blues. Bingham reached for lively country sounds early on, with... »»»
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