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Rogers becomes owner of Texas country club

Thursday, December 22, 2016 – Randy Rogers and a business partner purchased a well-known Texas country music club on Tuesday, he announced today.

Rogers, along with partner KRR Entertainment, became the official owner of the Cheatham Street Warehouse in San Marcos, Texas. Kent Finlay founded, owned and operated Cheatham Street from 1974 up until his death on Texas Independence Day in 2015.

KRR Entertainment is an Austin based event production company that co-founded Lone Star Jam and produces events at the Nutty Brown Amphitheatre.

In 1975, George Strait made his debut at the venue, and Guy Clark once sat in with Townes Van Zandt, playing well past midnight closing time. In 1980, Stevie Ray Vaughan had a regular Tuesday night gig, and Charlie and Will Sexton, then 12 and 10, would open for Vaughn and sometimes join him on stage. There was a time when each Strait and Vaughan played one night a week at the venue.

"I still get butterflies when I step on that stage. I'm going to make sure other songwriters and musicians young and old get to experience that same feeling for many years to come. That's my goal," says Rogers, who purchased from Kent Finlay's children, Jenni, Sterling and HalleyAnna.

In 2000, Rogers was a student at then Southwest Texas State University, pursuing a mass marketing degree. Every Wednesday, he would make his way to the building by the railroad tracks to perform the open songwriter night.

He credited those songwriter nights for kick starting his career. Those nights spawned his relationship with Finlay.

Rogers met and formed Randy Rogers Band within the walls of Cheatham Street, and when they signed their first major label deal years later, they did it there, with Finlay by their sides.

Although a few cosmetic changes and updates are in the works - addition of a permanent patio and food service at the top of the list - the primary goal is to maintain the character of the venue.

More news for Randy Rogers Band

CD reviews for Randy Rogers Band

Hellbent CD review - Hellbent
Randy Rogers makes a big, bold statement with his title track, but it's the smaller insightful moment expressed through "Wine In A Coffee Cup" that stands out most. Rogers sings it empathetically over a swaying groove, one highlighted by equally empathetic fiddle. And it's an unusual drinking song. It's not about someone going out to a club and noisily ordering round after round to conspicuously drink away a heartache. Instead, it's a woman applying an »»»
Nothing Shines Like Neon CD review - Nothing Shines Like Neon
Randy Rogers Band's latest album cover provides insight into the music contained within. The brightly lit neon sign is a familiar sight to those who frequent honky tonks and smoky barrooms. The Texas country band plays music that is designed specifically for these locations and crowds within. Almost every song on this album has alcohol as one of the main characters. Fresh on the heels of Rogers' excellent twang filled collaboration with Wade Bowen, he returns with his full band with a »»»
Trouble
With "Trouble" the Randy Rogers Band seems to be attempting to straddle the line between hard-edged Texas alternative country and slick Nashville mainstream. Rogers is at his best when he sticks to alt.-country, as with the rocker Fuzzy in which he vaguely recalls the alcohol influenced events from the previous evening ("Who the hell is Heather/And when were we together/Cause I've got every letter of her name on my chest"). Similarly the bluesy Shotgun »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Combs, Gill, Harris, Crow comprise one final musical platter – Vince Gill played host to an entertaining guitar pull, a show which also featured his longtime friend, Emmylou Harris, slightly newer friend Sheryl Crow and brand-new friend Luke Combs. Gill joked from the outset that this All for the Hall fundraising show needed Combs to sell tickets, and by the audience's response, it was clear many came only to see Combs.... »»»
Concert Review: Stapleton shows his traditional roots – Chris Stapleton's All-American Road show feels like a singular mission to rid the genre of the bro country scourge that has plagued it for years. He came out with a blazing one-two punch of "Second One To Know" and "Without Your Love" and packed a stadium sized onslaught into a 9,000-seat arena. He never once veered from his... »»»
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