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Womack, Clark, NGDB play AmericanaFest

Thursday, April 19, 2018 – Lee Ann Womack, Brandy Clark, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Jade Bird and John Oates were among the first artists named who will perform at the AmericanaFest in September in Nashville.

The Americana Music Association, which sponsors the fest, announced today 74 of more than 250 artists slated to play at AmericanaFest: The Americana Music Festival & Conference, which runs from Sept. 11-16.

Festival wristbands went on sale for $75 through the AMA's website. Wristbands allow admission into all evening showcase venues and select sanctioned parties and events.

The list of artists playing the fest includes:
Alejandro Escovedo
American Aquarium
American Folk
ANIMAL YEARS
The Black Lillies
Caitlin Canty
Carolina Story
Catherine Britt
Cedric Burnside
Chance McCoy
The Commonheart
Courtney Hartman
Dawn Landes
Dead Horses
Devon Gilfillian
Dom Flemons
Drivin N Cryin
The Earls of Leicester
Emily Scott Robinson
Erin Rae
Ghost of Paul Revere
H.C. McEntire
Hayley Thompson-King
Holly Golightly & The Brokeoffs
Holly Macve
Ida Mae
Israel Nash
Jade Jackson
Jaime Wyatt
Jamie McLean Band
Jeffrey Foucault
Jerry Douglas
Jill Andrews
Joe Purdy
John Carter Cash
John Craigie
Josh Rennie-Hynes
Katie Pruitt
Kim Richey
Lindsay Lou
Liz Brasher
Lucky Lips
Luke Winslow-King
Lula Wiles
Madisen Ward and The Mama Bear
Mary Gauthier
The McCrary Sisters
McKenzie Lockhart
Mountain Heart
Nicholas Jamerson
Phil Madeira
Prinz Grizzley and his Beargaroos
Ron Pope
Ruston Kelly
Sam Lewis
Scott Mulvahill
Shemekia Copeland
Shook Twins
The Small Glories
Sons Of Bill
Southern Avenue
Sunny War
Them Coulee Boys
Tommy Emmanuel
Vandoliers
The War and Treaty
Whiskey Wolves of the West
William Crighton
William Prince
Worry Dolls

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