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Rounder signs Ledger

Friday, September 7, 2018 – Logan Ledger has signed with Rounder Records with T Bone Burnett' producing.

Ledger was signed by Burnett's Electro Magnetic Recordings, which signed him to Rounder.

Ledger is in the studio with Burnett, who is producing his debut slated for release in 2019. He will preview material from the album on Sept. 14 at the Mercy Lounge during AmericanaFest in Nashville.

"The Rounder team and I are thrilled to have the opportunity to work with Logan, a young singer and writer who easily qualifies as Nashville's best kept secret," said Rounder Records President John Strohm. "Rounder has a long history of successful projects with T Bone, and we are humbled to be a part of what we believe will prove to be one of the finest productions of his remarkable career."

Burnett said. "A couple of years ago, my great friend Dennis Crouch sent me a recording of a song called "Let the Mermaids Flirt with Me" by a young singer and writer named Logan Ledger. He had, and has, a voice filled with history. I could hear echoes of one great singer after another in his tone. He sang without artifice. As we have been working together over the last couple of years, I have begun to discover the wide territory he is able to cover, and I look forward to exploring these new worlds of music with him."

Ledger said, "Ever since I was kid listening to Doc Watson and Norman Blake records in my childhood home and dreaming about a life in music, Rounder has been an important presence in my life. It's an honor to be working with a record label that not only proudly represents decades of our musical tradition, but also believes that history continues to inform our future sonic landscape."

"It has been a real privilege to work with T Bone on this record. We share a musical vision for the twenty-first century born from the deep well of American music. It has also been a joy to play alongside my gurus (both musical and otherwise) Dennis Crouch, Russ Pahl, and Jay Bellerose."

Native Californian Ledger began singing as a young child and started playing old-time and bluegrass music on guitar at age 12. Enamored of early roots music recordings of Appalachian ballads and string bands from the 1930s, he soon discovered the music of Hank Williams and George Jones. He called it "a bomb going off in my mind" and started learning about country.

After college, he briefly returned to the Bay Area where he played with a bluegrass band, but soon was off to Nashville. "This was a further expression of my archaeological impulse with regard to music-making. I've always believed that in order to create something new with purpose, one must be steeped in the past and work from within the tradition."

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