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Berry being treated for cancer

Tuesday, January 22, 2019 – John Berry has been diagnosed with throat cancer, he revealed today.

Treated with antibiotics for a tonsil infection that started in November, Berry completed a 21-city Christmas tour without incident, but it never cleared up, even after a second round of antibiotics and steroids.

Berry saw an ENT in Nashville on Jan. 4 who ordered a CAT scan, which revealed what appeared to be a tumor in one of his tonsils. He went in for surgery to have both tonsils removed on six days later. While in surgery, it was found that the tumor was larger than his tonsil on one side. Doctors removed a small portion of his soft palate.

Berry had a malignant tumor on both tonsils. The expected treatment is five weeks and has over a 90 percent cure rate.

Berry and his wife, Robin, asked for help through prayers. According to his publicist, they have adopted Philippians 4:13 as their guidepost of inspiration: "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."

More news for John Berry

CD reviews for John Berry

What I Love the Most CD review - What I Love the Most
On his first release in four years, powerhouse vocalist John Berry sounds like he hasn't lost a step. Long revered for his soulful pipes and heartfelt songwriting, Berry keeps that candle lit and burning bright throughout a 10-track selection that taps into warm, radio ready country vibes that fit right within the artist's wheelhouse. "She's Mine" leads the record off with a solid mid-tempo ramble that manages to toe the line between pop and country, while »»»
Songs & Stories
Whether you're one who has "taken a shine" to John Berry's music or not, you have to at least give the singer/songwriter credit for making a live album the right way. Berry's studio albums sometimes get bogged down underneath the performer's over-the-top sentimentalism, but with a satchel full of funny stories, plus live audiences to keep him on track, this collection presents the man as a likable entertainer. Recorded at various tour stops between Bakersfield and Kalamazoo, this album leaves »»»
All The Way To There
John Berry recorded this latest in the basement of his Athens, Ga. home, and while it doesn't exactly sound homemade, it does retain a little more warmth than your average slick studio creation. Berry has always sung with a sincere heart-on-his-sleeve sound to his voice, and this album is true to that established form. In a sense, his performances are closer to Christopher Cross's adult contemporary odes, instead of traditional country music. His musical backing also settles for more pop and less »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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