Sign up for newsletter
 

Strait, Earle, Owen top new releases

Friday, March 29, 2019 – George Strait isn't your typical country singer today. That's because on "Honky Tonk Time Machine," he sticks with a traditional country sound. For him, that means honky tonk songs with some Tex-Mex and ballads thrown into the mix. He co-produced the music on his 30th studio album with Charles Ainsley.

Steve Earle pays tribute to the late Texas singer/songwriter extraordinaire Steve Earle on "GUY." Earle previously highlighted another of his musical mentors, Townes Van Zandt on "Townes."

Jake Owen returns with "Greetings from...Jake Owen," his debut for Big Loud Records. The release contains the songs "Down To The Honkytonk," and the number one Platinum-Selling track "I Was Jack (You Were Diane)"

Son Volt, the band led by Jay Farrar, returns with the highly politically-charged "Union." Farrar takes aim at what he perceives are the economic and political ills in the U .S. A portion of the songs was recorded at places associated with two important labor figures in American history - Mary Harris "Mother Jones" and Woody Guthrie. Three songs were tracked at the Mother Jones Museum in Mount Olive, Ill, and four others were recorded at the Woody Guthrie Center in Tulsa, Okla.

Eli Young Band has a greatest hits collection, "This is Eli Young Band: Greatest Hits." The disc contains 14 songs including two new songs , the single "Love Ain't" and "Where Were You."

Uncle Walt's Band - Walter Hyatt, David Ball and Champ Hood - were originally from Spartanburg, S.C., but pursued a career in Nashville at the urging of singer/songwriter Willis Alan Ramsey in the early '70s. An attempt at an album with Ramsey at the helm was unsuccessful, so the band headed back to Spartanburg in 1974 to produce their own debut LP, "Blame It on the Bossa Nova." The original self-released vinyl edition -1,000 copies sold through performances and self-promotion - disappeared quickly. The band headed back down to Austin with a reissue of the album, "Uncle Walt's Band." A remastered version of "Uncle Walt's Band" is being issued on Omnivore Recordings. Ball is the lone surviving band member.

Bluegrass band Chris Jones and the Night Drivers are out with "The Changing Road." The band consists of Jones, Jon Weisberger on bass and vocals, Mark Stoffel on mandolin and vocals and Gina Furtado on banjo and vocals,

Tim Bluhm, lead singer of The Mother Hips, is out with a solo country disc, "Sorta Surviving."

More news for George Strait

CD reviews for George Strait

Honky Tonk Time Machine CD review - Honky Tonk Time Machine
At this stage of his nearly four-decades-long career, George Strait sure knows his sweet spot. Take a look at the cover of his 30th studio album, and it's understood that it's the honky tonks that are part and parcel of the tall Texan. Not to mention the title. And that means, Strait is going to be singing about drinking, loving and faith in styles ranging from honky tonk to straight ahead country to Tex-Mex stylings to ballads. You're also going to hear fiddle and pedal steel »»»
Cold Beer Conversation CD review - Cold Beer Conversation
recording front. This surprise release shows an artist now in his early 60s completely capable of being the leading voice for his brand of country music, which is increasingly rare these days. Strait always has enjoyed a voice that resonates and is dexterous depending on the style. And the Texan sticks with the types of styles that brought him to the top - traditional country ("Let It Go," "Goin' Goin' Gone"), Texas swing ("It Takes All Kinds") and Zydeco »»»
The Cowboy Rides Away: Live From AT&T Stadium CD review - The Cowboy Rides Away: Live From AT&T Stadium
George Strait has been one of the most dependable country music stars for three decades. In this day and age, the Texan is a certifiable throwback. He's low key, not a self-promoter. All's he has done is churn out hit after hit for decade after decade. He has not been the kind of artist who put his finger up in the air either or trading his cowboy hat for a baseball cap. When looking up the definition of traditional country, George Strait sits at the top. Strait tackles 20 songs on »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: For Brooks and fans, a most unusual change of pace – To say that this was a change of pace for Garth Brooks - not to mention his fans - would be an understatement of the highest degree. Brooks all but begged during the show to be playing next door at Gillette Stadium where the New England Patriots play. But, alas, Brooks exuded joy and excitement at the chance to play before about 500 people at a club,... »»»
Concert Review: LBT proves more than capable – If you have seen Little Big Town in the last decade, it could have been anywhere from a B stage at a Rib Fest to a 20,000-seat amphitheater as the opener for some of country's top acts. Their current "Nightfall" tour rightfully proves they are more than capable and well deserved being billed as a top headlining act.... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

The Mavericks "Play the Hits" When recording its album "Play the Hits," The Mavericks approached this covers album in much the same way the band creates any of its other studio albums. "Above all, we're always trying to reach a certain musical bar that we... »»»
Larue moves "Onward" The release of "Onward," his eighth studio album, finds veteran Texas Music/Red Dirt artist Stoney Larue at a crossroads. After almost two decades on the road, playing 200 shows a year across America and abroad, he has had success... »»»
Willis, Robison spin "Beautiful Lie" Eleven years ago, Kelly stepped away from music. She had just finished touring on 2007's exquisite "Translated From Love" and felt the angst of being a travelling musician with family at home. At that point, Willis and her husband, musician/producer Bruce Robison,... »»»
Country Fuzz
It's not unusual for country artists to include a few party anthems on their albums. These tracks help lighten the mood among a record's heavier moments and make for fun concert numbers. The Cadillac Three »»»
LP5 CD review - LP5
John Moreland's plain, unpretentious title indicates more of the same, but those of you (most of you most likely) expecting another batch of great, but deeply sad songs may find a few surprises on "LP 5."  »»»
What I Came Here For CD review - What I Came Here For
James Steinle is an emerging Texas singer-songwriter, who is already being hailed by Ray Wylie Hubbard and compared to story telling greats like Robert Earl Keen. Given that Bruce Robison produced "What I Came Here For" speaks volumes »»»
Tornillo CD review - Tornillo
The band name may suggest Appalachia and in some respects their sound does, but Lil Smokies hail from Montana, and deliver "Tornillo," their third release, which is named for the town where the studio for this release, Sonic Ranch, is located. »»»
Nightfall CD review - Nightfall
Little Big Town gets billed as a country music vocal group, but "Nightfall" plays out more like a four-headed singer-songwriter effort. Many of these songs hearken back to some of the best '70s introspective songwriter efforts. »»»
Formations CD review - Formations
Hawktail features some of the finest players of a generation in traditional American acoustic music. The product of their collaboration, "Formations," is a testament to the musical milieu in which they create.  »»»