Tenpenny sets fall tour

Thursday, July 25, 2019 – Mitchell Tenpenny announced today his headlining Anything She Says Tour.

New act Seaforth will open the shows, which start in Nashville on Oct. 10 and end Dec. 15 in New York.

"So excited to get to do my own tour with my homies Seaforth," said Tenpenny. "Can't wait to see y'all out there - it's gonna be a party."

Tenpenny and Seaforth - the duo of Tom Jordan and Mitch Thompson - also released a collaboration, "Anything She Says," which the three also co-wrote with Andy Albert and Jordan Schmidt.

Tickets go on sale Aug. 2. Tour dates are:
Oct. 10 Marathon Music Works - Nashville, TN
Oct. 12 Rams Head Live - Baltimore, MD
Oct. 19 Dallas Bull - Tampa, FL
Oct. 25 Georgia Theatre - Athens, GA
Oct. 27 House of Blues - Lake Buena Vista, FL
Oct. 31 Upstate Concert Hall - Clifton Park, NY
Nov. 1 Starland Ballroom - Sayreville, NJ
Nov. 2 Turning Stone Resort Casino - Verona, NY
Nov. 22 Coyote Joe's - Charlotte, NC
Nov. 23 Blind Horse Saloon - Greenville, SC
Dec. 4 House of Blues - Anaheim, CA
Dec. 8 Ace of Spades - Sacramento, CA
Dec. 14 Royal Oak Theatre - Royal Oak, MI
Dec. 15 Webster Hall - New York

Tenpenny, a Nashville native, is best known for his hit "Drunk Me" from his major label debut Telling All My Secrets (Riser House/Columbia Nashville). The album was released Dec. 14 and earned him 2018's best first-week showing for a major label country debut album.

Seaforth is childhood friends Jordan and Thompson, who grew up together in the Sydney, Australia suburb from where they take their name. Their debut single was "Love That," and they put out a four-song EP, "Love That," which they co-produced alongside award-winning producer Dann Huff.

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CD reviews

Telling All My Secrets CD review - Telling All My Secrets
Mitchell Tenpenny is yet one more artist stretching the definition of country music - nearly to the breaking point. While he sings with a distinctly enjoyable, Otis Redding-like soulful voice, the arrangements to these songs on his second album feature far more pop than twang. Steve Earle famously commented how contemporary country music is "hip-hop for people who are afraid of black people," but some of it - including this album's songs - sounds like pop music that doesn't »»»