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Pearce, Ray tie the knot

Monday, October 7, 2019 – Carly Pearce and Michael Ray had every little thing in place for their wedding on Sunday in the Nashville area.

Ray, 31, and Pearce, 29, were married before about 100 family members and friends on a Nashville-area farm, according to People.

"Knowing without a shadow of a doubt that I didn't settle for something less than truly the person that I think was made for me is something that I am thankful for," says Pearce, who had a number one hit with "Every Little Thing" about past romantic problems.

"No matter what, I have her in my corner," Ray said. "No matter what, she has me in her corner. I tell her, you're never going to face anything alone. Never will there be anything in life that you don't look over and I'm standing beside you."

The wedding took place at Drakewood Farm, about 15 miles north of downtown Nashville. Originally set for outdoors, the weather forced the ceremony inside.

Bill Cody, a country radio DJ and announcer at Nashville's Grand Ole Opry, officiated. "It just feels special," said Pearce, "because it's kind of all-encompassing of country music and the Opry and our story. And his voice is just so sweet."

The guest list had few celebrities with singer Lindsay Ell among them. "We really wanted it just to be about the people that know us as Carly and Michael," Pearce said.

Jake Owen was on hand to sing "Made for You," a romantic ballad off his most recent album. Ray asked Owen a few months ago: "I told him the date, and he immediately went to his calendar, and was like, 'I'm in. I would love to. I've never been a wedding singer before.' So it all worked."

Due to touring schedules, Pearce and Ray won't honeymoon until December when they will go to Jamaica. "We started talking about the honeymoon and he said, 'What's your dream vacation?'" Pearce said. "And I said, 'I want to stay in one of those over-water bungalows.' So, we're getting an over-water bungalow in Jamaica."

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