Guyton releases "Black Like Me" in wake of Floyd murder
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Guyton releases "Black Like Me" in wake of Floyd murder

Wednesday, June 3, 2020 – Mickey Guyton, one of the few African-American artists in country music, released the song "Black Like Me" on Tuesday.

Although written a year ago, Guyton just put out the song in the wake of the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis by police officer Derek Chauvin. Guyton co-wrote the song with co-producer Nathan Chapman, Emma Davidson-Dillon, and Fraser Churchill.

The piano-driven song describes idyllic lifestyle versus that of African-Americans.

Guyton wrote on Instagram, "It's Here!!!! I have rewritten this caption several times because even I don't have words that can properly express my emotions over the last few weeks. Our world is on fire right now. There is so much division and hate. I wrote this song over a year ago because I was so tired of seeing so much hate and oppression. And yet here we are in the exact same place! We must change that. I hope this song can give you a small glimpse into what my brothers and sisters have endured for 400+ years. "It's a hard life on easy street. Just white painted picket fences far as you can see. If you think we live in the land of the free, you should try to be black like me" #BlackLikeMe is OUT EVERYWHERE RIGHT NOW🖤 Thank you @nathanchapmanofficial @etothedd @fraserchurchill for taking my heart and putting it in a song.

The lyrics are:
Little kid in a small town
I did my best just to fit in
Broke my heart on the playground, mmh
When they said I was different

Oh, now
Now, I'm all grown up and nothin' has changed
Yeah, it's still the same

It's a hard life on easy street
Just white painted picket fences far as you can see
If you think we live in the land of the free
You should try to be black like me

My daddy worked day and night
For an old house and a used car
Just to live that good life, mmh
It shouldn't be twice as hard

Oh, now
Now, I'm all grown up and nothin' has changed
Yeah, it's still the same

It's a hard life on easy street
Just white painted picket fences far as you can see
If you think we live in the land of the free
You should try to be, oh, black like me

Oh, I know
I'm not
The only one
Oh, yeah
Who feels
Like I
I don't belong

It's a hard life on easy street
Just white painted picket fences far as you can see
And if you think we live in the land of the free
You should try to be, oh, black like me
Oh, and some day we'll all be free
And I'm proud to be, oh, black like me
And I'm proud to be black like me
I'm proud to be black like me
Black like me

The Texas native has been on the Capitol Nashville native and released a number of singles, but has yet to release a full-length album.

In a subsequent post on Instagram, Guyton wrote in white letters against a black background, "To every country artist not speaking up, now is your chance. We se you and need you to use your platform to be a part of the change."

Many country artists have commented about the Floyd murder over the past week, including fellow African-American artists Kane Brown and Darius Rucker.


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CD reviews for Mickey Guyton

CD review - Mickey Guyton Mickey Guyton, a Dallas native, follows in the footsteps of female singers like Carrie Underwood and Martina McBride on this 4-song, 16-minute CD that's probably meant as more of an introduction for those who never heard her 2014 very much under the radar EP, "Unbreakable." That translates into a powerful set of vocal chords that dominate. Guyton brings a sense of authenticity to the opening "Why Baby Why." She doesn't need to go full-blown vocally all the time, but ...


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