For Pearce, her music is "Written in Stone"
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For Pearce, her music is "Written in Stone"

Tuesday, August 3, 2021 – Carly Pearce went personal on her February EP, 29." And come Sept. 17, she's back with "29: Written in Stone," the original seven songs plus eight more.

The EP was based in part at least on Pearce's martial split from singer Michael Ray.

"So much has happened to me in the last year," said Pearce. "The more my life unraveled, the more the songs lifted me up. As the smoke cleared, and some unbelievable things started happening, I was writing even more truth and getting lifted up even higher – and I realized, as much as '29' captured a moment, I wasn't done with the story."

Today, she put out "Dear Miss Loretta," a personal outreach to Loretta Lynn featuring Patty Loveless. The release drops Aug. 3 to coincide with Pearce's Grand Ole Opry induction.

It was the Grand Ole Opry that brought Loveless to the track. Loveless was listening to the Opry when she heard Pearce perform the heartfelt ballad about having a song move from cool poetry to stone cold life. She let the woman who co-wrote "I Hope You're Happy Now" with Luke Combs, Jonathan Singleton and Randy Montana know she would love to sing that piece of truth that concluded, "I ain't a coal miner's daughter, But I've sung it all my life/ I ain't been a widow, But I've been an ex-wife/ And I hear your truth, And I feel your pain/ Now I know why you sang that way..."

"To hear Patty Loveless sing your words, there's no way to describe that sensation," Pearce said. "Her voice is Appalachia, those mountains and hollers are country music. To think, a year ago, I was asking myself, 'What would Patty Loveless do?' thinking about all her songs, how smart and sassy she always was and now she's on one of mine."

"Once I started writing, I thought I'd gotten it all out of my system," said Pearce. "But the songs just kept on coming, and I realized to truly understand how you come out the other side, not just a quick snapshot, this full project needed to happen. Now people can see how you thrive and shine even in the lowest moments."

The track list is:
1. "Diamondback" | Carly Pearce, Kelsea Ballerini, Tofer Brown, Shane McAnally
2. "What He Didn't Do" | Carly Pearce, Ashley Gorley, Emily Shackelton
3. "Easy Going" | Carly Pearce, Natalie Hemby, Josh Osborne
4. "Dear Miss Loretta" (featuring Patty Loveless) | Carly Pearce, Brandy Clark, Shane McAnally
5. "Next Girl" | Carly Pearce, Shane McAnally, Josh Osborne
6. "Should've Known Better" | Carly Pearce, Jordan Reynolds, Emily Shackelton
7. "29" | Carly Pearce, Shane McAnally, Josh Osborne
8. "Never Wanted To Be That Girl" (featuring Ashley McBryde) | Carly Pearce, Shane McAnally, Ashley McBryde
9. "Your Drinkin', My Problem" | Carly Pearce, Nicolle Galyon, Sasha Sloan, Ben West
10. "Liability" | Carly Pearce, Shane McAnally, Josh Osborne
11.
"Show Me Around" | Carly Pearce, Emily Shackelton, Ben West
13. "Day One" | Carly Pearce, Shane McAnally, Josh Osborne, Matthew Ramsey
14. "All The Whiskey In The World" | Carly Pearce, Jordan Terry Minton, Jordan Reynolds, Emily Shackelton
15. "Mean It This Time" | Carly Pearce, Jordan Terry Minton, Jordan Reynolds, Emily Shackelton


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CD reviews for Carly Pearce

CD review - 29: Written in Stone Carly Pearce's music is one more good reason to not completely give up on mainstream country radio. Songs like "I Hope You're Happy Now" and "Next Girl" stand out on radio for good reason – they're really good. Pearce's full-length is filled with many such tunes that can vastly improve overall radio music quality. The acoustic instrumental interplay driving "Easy Going," for instance, just shouts, 'Traditional arrangements are still ...
CD review - Carly Pearce Carly Pearce's self-titled sophomore album was fittingly released on Valentine's Day. Love is in the air throughout the 13-track collection. She opens with the breezy "Closer To You" and "Call Me. The album is chock full of notable co-write credits. On the latter, Little Big Town's Jim Westbrook and Phil Sweet have a hand. It feels like a love letter to fellow country singer and husband Michael Ray. Later on, she ratchets up the pop factor on a throwaway duet ...


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