OCMS inks with ATO
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OCMS inks with ATO

Wednesday, October 27, 2021 – Old Crow Medicine Show announced the band has inked with ATO Records.

The band and label previously partnered on Old Crow Medicine Show's 2012 album "Carry Me Back" and their 2014 breakthrough "Remedy," which won a GRAMMY for Best Folk Album in 2015. The band's sixth studio album "Volunteer" was released in 2018 on Columbia Nashville and was followed by the self-released "Live at the Ryman" in 2019.

OCMS lead singer Ketch Secor said, "We are very happy to be coming home to the ATO family. Their passion for music shows in everything they release and we're just so excited to relaunch our partnership and recommit ourselves to making great records together."

Jon Salter, President of ATO Records, said, "OCMS is one of the great and important American bands. They have always challenged themselves creatively, and this new project is testament to that. We're so thrilled and proud to welcome the band back with open arms to the ATO family, and we are committed to continue to build their legacy."

The band currently consists of Mike Harris – guitar, mandolin, banjo, Dobro, vocals, Morgan Jahnig – upright bass, Jerry Pentecost – drums, vocals, Mason Via- guitar vocals, Cory Younts - mandolin, drums, keyboards, vocals, and Secor - vocals, fiddle, harmonica, banjo, guitar.

In the last year, the band has released three tracks that all speak to the current state of the world – "Nashville Rising" written after Nashville's Super Tuesday tornadoes and directly benefiting relief efforts, "Quarantined" a tongue-in-cheek, classic country-inspired number about not being able to kiss your lover while quarantined, and "Pray For America," which was commissioned by NPR as an inspirational piece for listeners coming out of COVID. They also appeared on a duet with Keb' Mo' titled "The Medicine Man" and recently teamed up with filmmaker Julia Golonka to create a video for their 2008 track "Motel In Memphis," raising funds for Nashville's community-based grassroots organization Gideon's Army.

In early 2020, Old Crow Medicine Show purchased a building in Nashville that has since been dubbed the band's "Hartland Studio," where they are recording new music and producing their "Hartland Hootenanny" live stream variety shows.

OCMS also is touring in November and December. Tour dates are:
Nov. 12 – Madison, WI @ The Sylvee
Nov. 13 – Nashville, IN @ Brown County Music Center
Dec. 1 – Norfolk, VA @ The NorVa
Dec. 2-3 – Durham, NC @ The Carolina Theatre
Dec. 16 – Kansas City, MO @ Uptown Theater
Dec. 17 – Newkirk, OK @ 7 Clans Casino
Dec. 27 – Greenville, SC @ The Peace Center
Dec. 28 – Knoxville, TN @ Tennessee Theatre
Dec. 30-31 – Nashville, TN @ Ryman Auditorium


More news for Old Crow Medicine Show


CD reviews for Old Crow Medicine Show

CD review - Live From the Ryman The very best way - the only way, really - to see Old Crow Medicine Show is live. Like its namesake, the medicine shows of old that were part preaching, part snake oil sales pitches, part old time music and pure entertainment, the band delivers a high-energy performance that keeps the crowd on its feet the entire show. This album includes the band's performances recorded between 2013 and 2019 at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, and what better place than the Mother Church of country music ...
CD review - Volunteer Dave Cobb produced "Volunteer" for Old Crow Medicine Show, and while word on the street was that this promised to be a more rocking, less roots music effort, such talk shouldn't dissuade fans of the group's established sound from checking it out. Sure, there may be a little more electric guitar than on past efforts, but this is still very much OCMS music. While rock and roll is not the best term for these songs, perhaps rambunctious best describes some of them. ...
CD review - 50 Years of Blonde on Blonde Whenever an artist attempts to cover a classic work in whole, it can't help but seem like a somewhat audacious effort from the outset. After all, tackling an album that's stood the test of time, one that's already an integral part of the musical lexicon in its original form, is a formidable task. At best, the original artist's imprint is difficult to supersede, but at worst it can become a regrettable error that yields disastrous results. Consequently, credit Old Crow ...


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