Dwight Yoakam, Crystal Gayle, Norro Wilson join Kentucky Music Hall of Fame

Thursday, February 21, 2008 – Dwight Yoakam, Crystal Gayle and writer/producer Norro Wilson entered the Kentucky music Hall of Fame Thursday along with other performers from the Bluegrass State.

Stage and television star Florence Henderson and jazz and soul musician Les McCann also were enshrined in the call.

Gayle performed "Coal Miner's Daughter" with her sisters Loretta Lynn and Peggy Sue.

"We didn't have a lot," Gayle told the audience, remembering her early life in Kentucky in a reported at Kentucky.com. "We didn't know it. We didn't care. We had a lot of music in our house."

John Michael Montgomery introduced Yoakam during the ceremony. "Everything I was going to be about and am about to this point in my life comes from southeastern Kentucky," Yoakam said, who grew up in Ohio. "It was and is the cornerstone and foundation of my musical creative life and my personal life."

Wilson performed songs he wrote including "The Most Beautiful Girl," sung by Charlie Rich, and "The Grand Tour," a No. 1 hit for George Jones. Jones appeared in a video tribute for Wilson.

Wilson said in his speech recalling Kentucky, "I love little baby ducks and slow moving trains and planes; I love Scottsville, Ky...I love this golden moment. You'd better believe it."

McCann and Henderson could not attend the ceremony.

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