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Tim Easton offers "Porcupine"

Monday, March 2, 2009 – Rootsy musician Tim Easton will be back with his fifth album, "Porcupine," April 28 on New West Records. The Joshua Tree, Cal. resident's sound is rooted in blues, rock and. Easton will be on the road with a band, including a stop in Austin for South By Southwest.

Easton returned to Alex The Great and Club Roar studios in Nashville to work with Brad Jones and Robin Eaton who produced his debut album, Special 20. He wanted to "make some noise and get that jagged, midwestern rock and roll sound again" so he hand-picked the Ohio-based rhythm section - Sam Brown on drums (Gaunt, New Bomb Turks, RJD2) and Matt Surgeson on bass and backing vocals (he also played on Easton's "Special 20"). Guitarist Kenny Vaughn, who Easton met playing in Lucinda Williams' band for her Car Wheels tour, played second guitar.

As for the title, Easton said, "I thought the physical animal called the porcupine was a perfect symbol for the sound of this record in that it appears to be a gentle and harmless creature from a distance but up close it is in fact sharp and potentially dangerous."

Easton previously released 3 albums on New West: "The Truth About Us" (2001), "Break Your Mother's Heart" (2003) and "Ammunition" (2006). He has toured with label mates John Hiatt and The Flatlanders, as well as with The Jayhawks and Lucinda Williams. Living in the village of Joshua Tree between tours has made more time available for other creative endeavours such as painting and writing. "There's not much else to do out here," he said, "so going for long hikes with my dogs or making music, paintings, and stories is what fills my average day at home." A series of 500 individually painted vinyl album jackets will be part of the "Porcupine" release, and the New West CD release will feature Easton's art on the cover.

Tour dates include:
March 18-21 - South By South West including:
Pop Culture Press day party (March 18 at The Dog and Duck Pub)
New West Records day party (March 19 at Club Deville)
Sin City Social Club day party (March 20 at Maria's Tacos)
Ground Control Touring showcase (March 20 at Habana Bar Backyard)
Monday April 27 Fort Wayne, Ind. Brass Rail
Thursday April 30 Chicago, IL The Hideout
Friday May 1 Columbus, Ohio The Rumba Cafe
Saturday May 2 Whitesburg, Ky. Summit City
Sunday May 3 Charleston, West Va. Mountain Stage at Cultural Center Theater
Tuesday May 5 Arlington, Va. IOTA Club and Cafe
Wednesday May 6 New York, The Mercury Lounge 8pm
Thursday May 7 Philadelphia, Johnny Brendas
Friday June 5 Los Angeles, The Mint

CD reviews for Tim Easton

Paco and Melodic Polaroids CD review - Paco and Melodic Polaroids
Paco is the name of Tim Easton's Gibson J-45, which he bought for $100 and a couple of trade-ins 30 years ago. The name was bestowed on the guitar in Paris by a Deadhead. It's been Easton's best traveling companion and songwriting aid. For this occasion, Easton recorded the album in Bristol, Va. via a vintage and portable lathe which cuts a mono signal directly to a lacquer acetate disc, much the way The Carter Family or Jimmie Rodgers made their first records over 90 years ago. »»»
Not Cool CD review - Not Cool
Over the course of his nearly 20-year career, Tim Easton has been steered by both influence and geography; witness the twangy blister of his early mid-Ohio/Midwest days and the Gram Parsons expanse of his Joshua Tree period. Likewise, "Not Cool," Easton's seventh studio album, reflects his move back to the middle of the country as well as his fascination with the legacy of his new Nashville surroundings. Like a classic country album, "Not Cool" clocks in at half an hour »»»
Ammunition CD review - Ammunition
After making inroads with his last album, "Break Your Mother's Heart," singer-songwriter Tim Easton is back with a lovely slab of warm, soothing tracks that eerily brings to mind Dylan. Just check out "C-Dub" and "News Blackout" for proof. In no hurry, songs like "Black Dog" takes on a relaxing tone in the vein of Mark Knopfler while "Oh People" has a light, breezy folksy ramble to it. The same can be said for the shuffling, punchy and fantastic "Not Today." Recorded with little else than an »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Rising Appalachia buck the mainsteam, and that's fine with them – Rising Appalachia would not be accused of being in the musical mainstream. Not too many bands who combine folk and Appalachian sounds with new world music could possibly be. And that suits the sister-led duo of Chloe Smith and Leah Song just fine. In fact, at one point, Chloe made it clear she did not embrace radio play as a sign of success... »»»
Concert Review: Bingham plays with something to prove – Ryan Bingham mainly focused on songs from his sixth album "American Love Song," for this lively show. Backed by a supportive band that also included two female backup singers and a fiddler, Bingham's eclectic setlist touched upon country, singer/songwriter folk, rock and blues. Bingham reached for lively country sounds early on, with... »»»
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