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Tiger gets the Cledus treatment

Wednesday, December 9, 2009 – Tiger Woods is getting the Cledus T. Judd treatment. Using Tiger by the Tail, recorded by Buck Owens in 1965, as the reference point, Tiger by the Tail (The Tale of Tiger Woods), was written by Judd with Wix Wichmann, and Phillip White. Judd recorded the song less than a week ago and is already getting spins on major radio stations in Chicago (WUSN-FM), Tampa (WQYK-FM), and Knoxville (WIVK-FM) and is available for download on iTunes and Amazon.com. The song can be heard streaming here and will be up on www.cledustjudd.net later this afternoon.

"What got my attention first off on this story was Tiger is worth hundreds of millions of dollars, and he's messing around with a gal who works for Perkins. With his kind of money, I'd at leasat gone for somebody a little classier ... like a 3rd shift manager at IHOP," said Judd.

Song lyrics are:

Well, she beat Tiger all to hell, it's plain to see,
hit him in his golf balls from the black and blue tees
She was teed off from a tough lie, he tried to tell
And looks like she beat Tiger all to hell

Well, he thought he'd cheat on her and she'd stand by her man,
She knocked out his window with his three iron in her hand
He got up and down in a skins game with a cheap Jezebel..
And that's why she beat Tiger all to hell

Well, she beat Tiger all to hell, it's plain to see,
Looks like he's had a hole in one or two or three,
He should have never pulled out his wood, yeah, he should have kept it to himself,
That's why she beat Tiger all to hell

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CD reviews for Cledus T. Judd

Polyrically Uncorrect CD review - Polyrically Uncorrect
Any artist that aspires to the Yankovic-ian brand of success known as the song parodist wants to be graded on a special curve. They might even deserve it. Cledus T. Judd (born Barry Poole) has taken his lumps in the fame machine, working across multiple labels and moonlighting as a DJ. But we can't overlook the funny, and Judd has done that very thing himself this time. Focusing half the record, mystifyingly, on the downturn of the economy, Judd makes a bid for credibility or desperation. »»»
Bipolar and Proud
Parodist Cledus T. Judd has recently eschewed the more manic aspects of his comedic character and gravitated toward relative subtlety, while only hinting at something zanier. Such is the case with this uneven 10-song collection boasting flashes of humor and one surprisingly affecting straight performance. When Judd tackles the current poker craze with some double entendre word play ("One Jack Off") or serves up his superior remake of Brent Burns' barroom trolling ditty ("I'm Going Ugly Early »»»
A Six Pack of Judd
Cledus T. Judd eschews his normal Junior Samples-on-helium vocals for this subtler, still amusing collection of country parodies. The shock here isn't that Judd is funny without squawking through his nose, it's that he possesses an appealing singing voice that embraces the tone of the songs he satirizes. Judd's six-song budget-priced set boasts country icon George Jones' guest appearance on "I Was Country When Country Wasn't Pop," a wonderfully snarky and resonant remake of Barbara Mandrell's »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: For Brooks and fans, a most unusual change of pace – To say that this was a change of pace for Garth Brooks - not to mention his fans - would be an understatement of the highest degree. Brooks all but begged during the show to be playing next door at Gillette Stadium where the New England Patriots play. But, alas, Brooks exuded joy and excitement at the chance to play before about 500 people at a club,... »»»
Concert Review: LBT proves more than capable – If you have seen Little Big Town in the last decade, it could have been anywhere from a B stage at a Rib Fest to a 20,000-seat amphitheater as the opener for some of country's top acts. Their current "Nightfall" tour rightfully proves they are more than capable and well deserved being billed as a top headlining act.... »»»
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