Lost Trailers call it a day
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Lost Trailers call it a day

Friday, June 4, 2010 – The Lost Trailers are apparently calling it a day by the end of the year.

The group, which had a hit with Holler Back in 2008, is continuing to tour, but members will pursue other musical endeavors.

The group lists 23 dates on its web site, some with the Country Throwdown Tour and some on their own. The final date listed is Sept. 11 in South Jacksonville, Ill.

"I'm thrilled to finish playing out the shows on the calendar for our fans," lead singer Ryder Lee said in an interview with GACTV. "We've been blessed to have their unending support over the years."

Ryder and songwriter Stokes Nielson performed together in a Virginia high school. Drummer Jeff Potter, keyboard player Andrew Nielson and bass player Manny Medina later joined the group.

An invite from Willie Nelson to play at his annual July 4th picnic in Austin was a career boost.

"We started this band as a bunch of high school friends with a dream of making music, and we've taken that dream to incredible places that have opened a lot of doors for us," Stokes Nielson said. "I look forward to thanking the fans on our tour dates throughout this year; they've always been there for us."

"I'm very much looking forward to the next phase of my career," Ryder said.


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CD reviews for The Lost Trailers

CD review - Holler Back There seems to be a strong theme to this Georgia quintet's third major label CD. Almost every song is about country living. Either about how great it is to rusticate or conversely how great it is to get of the backwoods. In the title track and first single, the misplaced mobile homes feel out of place in a hip-hop world and long to return to Hillbilly Heaven. Blacktop Road and Country Folks (Livin' Loud) are paeans to pastoral living. The singer of Things You Don't Grow Out Of had ...
CD review - The Lost Trailers When The Lost Trailer's singer Ryder Lee states emphatically, "I'm a country man," within the song of the same name, he's expressing regional rather than musical roots. This five-piece group may rock harder than most traditional country acts, but they aren't tough enough to compete with the alternative fury of either Drive-By Truckers or My Morning Jacket. Instead, they raise a little guitar-y dust via "Dixie Boy Special," and then remind you of Steve ...


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