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Washburn releases Chinese tour videos

Friday, January 27, 2012 – Abigail Washburn released videos of her Chinese tour on her web site.

""In November & December 2011, I headed to China to tour the historic Silk Road that Marco Polo made famous centuries ago; the major trade route of the ancient world," Washburn said in an email release.

"Accompanied by the finest U.S. musicians and humans you could meet, "The Village" toured from Hohhot to Urumqi, stopping to perform and collaborate all along the way with only the goal of building bridges and dissolving difference by communing in good music. Supported by the US Embassy and the Chinese International Center for Exchange, we performed extensively at schools, universities and theaters and spontaneously on city walls and in town squares all across China's 'Wild West'. We also collaborated with amazing local musicians all along the route including Han Chinese, Mongolian, Tibetan, Hui and Uyghur musicians. With 12 videos (2 on National Geographic World Music), photo albums for every stop, and a map of our route along the Silk Road, we invite you to join us on the journey."

The Village is Abigail Washburn (banjos and vocal), Kai Welch (keys, trumpet, guitar and vocal), Jamie Dick (drums), Jared Engel (bass), Ross Holmes (fiddle), Brittany Haas (fiddle), Cain Hogsed (sound man), Luke Mines (videographer and editor).

Washburn will tour through April, including opening dates for The Jayhawks.

Jan. 31 - Solana Beach, CA / Belly Up Tavern (with the Jayhawks)

Feb. 1 - San Juan Capistrano, CA / The Coach House (with the Jayhawks)

Feb. 2 - Los Angeles, CA / Avalon (with the Jayhawks)

Feb. 3 & 4 - San Francisco, CA / The Fillmore (with the Jayhawks)

Feb. 6 - Petaluma, CA / Mystic Theatre (with the Jayhawks)

Feb. 7 - Portland, OR / Roseland Theater (with the Jayhawks)

Feb. 8 - Eugene, OR / McDonald Theatre (with the Jayhawks)

Feb. 9 - Seattle, WA / Neptune Theatre (with the Jayhawks)

Feb. 10 - Vancouver, BC / The Commodore Ballroom (with the Jayhawks)

Feb. 11 - Victoria, BC / Club 9One9 (with the Jayhawks)

March 7 - 26 / Australia

March 31 - Los Angeles, CA / The Getty

April 1 - Portland, OR / Mississippi Studios

April 3 - Seattle, WA / Tractor Tavern

April 5 - Savannah, GA / Savannah Music Festival

April 6 - Athens, GA / The Melting Point

April 7 - Nashville, TN / 3rd & Lindsley

April 11 - Lexington, KY / Natasha's Bistro

April 12 - St. Louis, MO / Sheldon Arts Foundation

April 13 - Carmel, IN / The Studio Theater

April 14 - Chicago, IL / Old Town School of Folk Music

April 17 - Huntsville, AL / Merrimack Hall

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