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DBT's Hood protests Wal-Mart in song

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 – Drove-By Truckers lead singer Patterson Hood is protesting a possible Wal-Mart in downtown Athens, Ga. with a song.

After it's Gone is the new single just released by Patterson Hood and the Downtown 13. The song was inspired by the threat of a Wal-Mart in the heart of the downtown that nurtured the band's career. Hood assembled The Downtown 13, a musical collective made up of Athens musicians to celebrate the city's musical heritage and to protest a developer's proposed building of a mixed use development in downtown Athens, anchored by a 94,000-square-foot Wal-Mart.

"This Atlanta developer wants to clog our cultural heart and build a bunker the size of three city blocks next to the vibrant downtown scene," says Hood. "They hit The Easy Button: a big box store in our downtown district is clearly misguided and a somewhat ridiculous notion. Downtown Athens is a dynamic network of local businesses--Athens already has a meaningful brand and we are extremely protective of it."

"We have a vibrant downtown with plans for the future that involve planned development along the river and hopefully a high speed rail to Atlanta," said Hood. "We don't need a big box retailer, the very definition of the past, to once again bring us back through that dark episode of closed down storefronts and empty parking lots. Protect Downtown Athens-- that's what this is all about."

The song can be downloaded. A video also is available.

The songs features members of Drive-By Truckers, Widespread Panic, R.E.M., Futurebirds, Hope For Agoldensummer, Lera Lynn, Justified True Belief and The Quick Hooks. Musicians were Patterson Hood - Lead Vocals, Guitar, Mike Mills - Harmonies and Piano, John Bell - Lead Vocals, John Neff - Pedal Steel, David Barbe - Bass, Jay Gonzalez - Wurlitzer Electric Piano, Brad Morgan - Drums, Todd Nance - Percussion, Claire Campbell - Banjo and Harmonies, Lera Lynn - Harmonies, Brannen Miles, Carter King and Payton Bradford - Backing Vocals and Henry Barbe - Electric Guitar.

More news for Patterson Hood

CD reviews for Patterson Hood

Heat Lightning Rumbles In The Distance CD review - Heat Lightning Rumbles In The Distance
For his third solo album, "Heat Lightning Rumbles In The Distance," singer, songwriter and Drive By Trucker Patterson Hood continues to create his own brand of American mythology, writing four minute elegies to a generation that's lost its way, one that's slowly slicing away at itself with a hard-edged blade of insecurity, confusion and loneliness. Taken on the surface, it's not a pretty picture at all. 12:01 is a creeping, crawling dirge about a clandestine trip across »»»
Murdering Oscar (and other love songs) CD review - Murdering Oscar (and other love songs)
When is a new album not a new album? 15 years ago, Patterson Hood moved to Athens, Ga. without knowing a soul and began writing songs and recording them in his roommate's more acoustically friendly bedroom. Hood collected the resulting tunes on cassettes then compiled a handful onto a single tape entitled "Murdering Oscar (and other love songs)" that he gave away by the hundreds at the time. After reconnecting with Mike Cooley and forming the first iteration of Drive-By Truckers, »»»
Patterson Hood
What strikes you initially about Patterson Hood's solo album is just how stripped down it is - especially compared to the high-powered Southern rock-isms of his band Drive-By Truckers. It's this subdued, because Hood wrote and recorded it at a particularly low point of his life. "I had just gotten divorced, was fighting with the band and a good number of friends," Hood explains in the liner notes. It sounds exactly like a home demo, which is actually what it is. And while it's not exactly pretty, »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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