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Grammys wrap-up: Big night for Taylor Swift, The Civil Wars

Monday, February 13, 2012 – Taylor Swift and The Civil Wars were the big winners Sunday night at the Grammys for the country crowd.

And, in fact, the two are linked because Swift caught a show of the duo at a Nashville club, bought up their merchandise and championed John Paul White and Joy Williams on social media. On her latest single, Safe & Sound for "The Hunger Games" soundtrack, The Civil Wars provide vocal help.

Swift won a Grammy for Best Country Solo Performance for Mean, which she sang at the awards after an intro from The Civil Wars. Mean also scored a Grammy for Best Country Song.

Written in response to a zealous critic, Swift joked, "There's really no feeling quite like writing a song about someone who's completely mean to you and completely hates you and then winning a Grammy for it."

The Civil Wars won Grammys for Best Country Duo/Group Performance and Best Folk Album for "Barton Hollow." The disc is their debut studio effort.

Lady Antebellum won the Grammy for Best Country Album for "Own This Night."

Levon Helm took the Americana Grammy for "Ramble At The Ryman," a live disc.

Alison Krauss & Union Station won two Grammys - Best Bluegrass Album and Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical for their sixth album "Paper Airplane." This latest accomplishment brings the band's total Grammy award count to 13 and is the 27th personal win for Krauss. She is the most awarded singer, the most awarded female artist and tied second for the most awarded artist overall in Grammy history.

Glen Campbell performed at the Grammys after wining a Lifetime Achievement Award. This was expected to be Campbell's swan song appearance at the Grammys because he is suffering from Alzheimer's Disease. He also received a tribute from Blake Shelton and The Band Perry before he came onstage for a rousing version of Rhinestone Cowboy.

George Jones also received a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Jason Aldean and Kelly Clarkson teamed up for a duet of Don't You Wanna Stay.

More news for The Civil Wars

CD reviews for The Civil Wars

Between the Bars
Music keeps flowing from The Civil Wars, and this four-song EP of covers is not filler. In fact, all four songs - Sour Times, Between the Bars, Billie Jean and Talking in Your Sleep - could easily have wound up on a full-scale release by Joy Lynn Williams and John Paul White. Including Billie Jean should come as no shock to anyone who has seen them live because this was a staple in their live gigs (although probably a surprise if you hadn't seen them before). The Michael Jackson song »»»
The Civil Wars CD review - The Civil Wars
One gets the distinct sense that there's a storm a brewing on the jacket of The Civil Wars major label debut. It appears that a huge plume of black smoke is all that remains. And that depiction may be most accurate in a number of ways for The Civil Wars, the duo of Joy Williams and John Paul White. First and perhaps foremost is that Williams and White seem to be at professional odds. As for the material contained here, for the most part, it's about relationships that either have or »»»
Barton Hollow CD review - Barton Hollow
Upon first listen, The Civil Wars comes off like a more Southern version of She & Him. While She & Him draws upon classic pop elements, The Civil Wars is much more country and folk focused. Charlie Peacock produced "Barton Hollow," giving it a simple, sparse acoustic sound; one that is very different from the man's usual solo music or other productions (early Switchfoot albums, which are all comprised of sharp electric guitar rock, and his own solo work veers closer to blue eyed soul). »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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