Young, Jackson, Crowell/Karr, Kramer top releases

Tuesday, June 5, 2012 – Neil Young is back with his longstanding backing band Crazy Horse (Ralph Molina Poncho Sampedro and Billy Talbot) for "Americana." The disc is a collection of generally well known classic American folk songs, including Oh Susanna, Clemntine, Gallows Pole, Wayfarin' Stranger and This Land is Your Land.

Alan Jackson is back but with a difference this time out - he's on a new label. "Thirty Miles West' marks his debut with Capitol after spending his entire career with Arista. The Georgian's current single is So You Don't Have to Love Me Anymore.

Rodney Crowell is a partner this time out, book author Mary Karr. The two are releasing "Kin, Songs by Mary Karr and Rodney Crowell." Karr wrote the book "Cherry" and "The Liar's Club."

Newcomer Jana Kramer has a background as an actress. The former "One Tree Hill" and "Friday Night Lights" cast member (she played Alex Dupre on "One Tree Hill") is out with her debut "Why Ya Wanna," which also happens to be the name of her charting single. Scott Hendricks produced the disc of the Michigan native.

Longstanding California band Marley's Ghost celebrates its 25th year as a band with "Jubilee." John Prine, Marty Stuart and Emmylou Harris all provide help.

More news for Alan Jackson

CD reviews for Alan Jackson

Genuine: The Alan Jackson Story CD review - Genuine: The Alan Jackson Story
Tim O'Brien "Pompadour" Howdy Skies Records Reviewed by Donald Teplyske It is difficult to tally exactly how many albums of new material Tim O'Brien has released since first appearing as part of Hot Rize, the venerable bluegrass band experiencing a well-received resurgence. More than 20 by any count, 30-plus when one considers solo, duet and group offerings, including his most recent success as part of the Earls of Leicester. Aside from a brief flirtation with the »»»
Angels and Alcohol CD review - Angels and Alcohol
Alan Jackson, circa 2015, now might be, unfortunately, considered a retro artist. Jackson, thankfully, does not veer from his traditional country beat on his first new studio disc in three years. It's the traditional sound that makes him a throwback today. In an age of rock and rap meshing with country, Jackson will have none of that on this meat-and-potatoes rendering. Jackson's viewpoint has always been about the simple truths of life. He makes that clear in the leadoff track, »»»
The Bluegrass Album CD review - The Bluegrass Album
Alan Jackson makes his statement crystal clear with the title - "The Bluegrass Album." The traditional country singer has "gone bluegrass," although the idea of a bluegrass disc should not come off as all that far fetched. Yes, there's no pedal steel here, but the sounds, subject and voice are not very different from a typical AJ disc. And this is not the first time that Jackson has veered off the straight and narrow path as his gospel albums indicated. »»»