Hank Williams film, discussion panel comes to New York

Friday, June 8, 2012 – The influence of Hank Williams on American music along with a new documentary about his final days will be the subject of an evening in New York later this month.

The New School, in conjunction with Oxford American Magazine, will present a free screening on June 20 of "The Last Ride," the new film about the mysterious final days of Williams, who died at 29 in a mysterious death. Following the screening, a panel will discuss Williams and his place in American music. No tickets or reservations required.

The movie begins a one-week exclusive engagement June 22 in the Cinema Village Theater, 22 East 12th St, to be followed by a national showcase theatrical release. Starring Henry Thomas, Jesse James and Kaley Cuoco, with Fred Dalton Thompson, "The Last " has been described by Oxford American Magazine editor, Mark Smirnoff as, "A hypnotic romp about what is possibly country music's most tantalizing true story."

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with Harry Thomason, director of "The Last Ride," director/producer of TV series, including "Designing Women," mini-series such as "The Blue and the Grey" and director of events including both presidential inaugurals of President William Clinton. Also appearing will be Hank Williams' daughter, Jett Williams, singer/songwriter with four songs on the film track and the award winning author of, "Ain't Nothin' As Sweet As My Baby: The Story of Hank Williams' Lost Daughter" plus one of the film producers, Benjy Gaither, son of the Gospel legends, Bill and Gloria Gaither and creator of "The Last Ride" sound track/album. Other panelists will be announced later.

The movie's soundtrack, to be released by Curb Records on June 19, contains some of the best-known Williams songs as well as new material written specifically for the film. Performers include Jett Williams, Michael English, The Isaacs, the late Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings.

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CD reviews for Hank Williams

The Garden Spot Program 1950 CD review - The Garden Spot Program 1950
In a career that spanned a mere six years - a minuscule amount of time compared to those who are today celebrating anniversaries of 40, 50 or even 60 years of more - Hank Williams established himself as an abiding influence on all those who followed, a man whose music is as relevant and revered today as it was when it was originally recorded. Indeed, what Williams accomplished in that scant amount of time still resonates nearly 70 years later. There's been an abundance of compilations, »»»
The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams CD review - The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams
"The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams" is a great story before you even start playing the music. Williams, according to the story, used to write down his lyric ideas in notebooks. When he died, there were four notebooks of unreleased or unperformed songs. Over the years, the notebooks remained in the possession of Williams' publishers Acuff-Rose and few knew of them. One who did, however, was longtime Nashville executive Mary Martin, who shepherded this project to its eventual light-of-day. »»»
Revealed The Unreleased Recordings CD review - Revealed The Unreleased Recordings
After his death in 1953, Hank Williams, became less a performer than a post-mortem brand name wherein his basic personality as an artist was increasingly downplayed and diminished. This remarkably enjoyable three-CD set, drawn from warmly remastered acetates - featuring occasional surface noise - of the old Mother's Best radio show, showcases much of that nearly lost essence. Supported by his regular collaborators the Drifting Cowboys, Williams brings surprising drive to live renditions his »»»