Coe hospitalized after car crash
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Coe hospitalized after car crash

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 – David Allan Coe was hospitalized in non-critical condition in Tuesday after his SUV crashed into a semi-trailer in Ocala, Fla. early Tuesday morning. Coe cancelled shows in Louisville, Ky. and Scheller, Ill.

Reports said that Coe went through a red light in his 2011 Chevrolet Suburban at about 1:30 a.m., and his vehicle was hit by a tractor-trailer carrying produce. The driver of the trailer and a passenger were hospitalized with the passenger released.

Coe apparently was going from a casino in Tampa to a home in Ormond Beach, Fla. where he played on Sunday.


CD reviews for David Allan Coe

CD review - Penitentiary Blues This 1969 debut was recorded shortly Coe's release from 20 years of off-and-mostly-on incarceration. The last stretch, three years at Marion, provided many of the images and experiences essayed here, as well as the attitudes and strategies that insulated Coe from relapse. Though recorded in Nashville, this is an outlaw blues album whose hard-time lyrics are sung as basic bar music with a lineup of guitar, bass, drums and harmonica. Coe's prisoners are trapped between their oppressed prison lives ...
David Allan Coe shows that he is still a versatile and talented songwriter on his first studio album for Lucky Dog. He can write drinking songs ("Drink My Wife Away," "Drink Canada Dry") without being stupid. He can write funny songs ("Songs For the Year 2000," "A Harley Someday") without being corny. He can write reflective songs ("The Price We'll Have to Pay," "In My Life") without being overly sentimental. Co-produced with one-half of the twangtrust, Ray Kennedy, Coe wrote all 11 songs on the album. ...
When Sony created an "alternative country" label and announced Coe as the first signing, hoots of derision were heard from the people who think the genre was invented by Uncle Tupelo. A guy who had some huge hit singles in the seventies, and wrote "Take This Job And Shove It," could only be considered 'alternative' by a major corporation out of touch with reality. The truth is that if anyone can lay claim to "inventing" alternative country, it's David Allan Coe. His small commercial success is a ...


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