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Gill, Franklin pay tribute to Buck, The Hag with new CD

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 – Vince Gill and steel guitarist Paul Franklin, announced Wednesday the release of "Bakersfield" on July 30 via MCA Nashville. Gill and Franklin pay tribute to the "Bakersfield" sound by performing songs from two of Bakersfield's sons; Buck Owens and Merle Haggard.

Gill and Franklin share the producing duties on the 10-song set. The disc was tracked in two days at Gill's home studio andbacked by John Hobbs, piano; Greg Morrow, drums; Willie Weeks and Brad Albin, bass; J. T. Corenflos, electric rhythm guitar; and Time Jumpers Kenny Sears, Larry Franklin, Joe Spivey, fiddles and Dawn Sears on harmony vocals. Gill played all the acoustic and electric guitar fills and solos.

"This is just as much a guitar record for me as it is a singing record," Gill said, "But it was fun for me to sing a whole record of the greatest songs ever. I guess what I'm real proud of is that when it's one of Buck's songs, I sing it very much in that vein. And the Haggard songs are very much in the vein he sang. With Buck's songs, you won't find much vibrato in my vocals, and with Merle's, it will come down to a low note and that quiver."

"This may be Vince's greatest project," Franklin said. "What a showcase. I've heard him sing for 30 years, but he sings licks on this record I never heard before."

Haggard, who wrote the albums liner notes, said, "Vince and Paul offer a great new touch on a great old sound. It was great, certainly to hear my music done with the great touch of Vince and Paul. I feel highly complimented. But it was especially great to hear what they did with Bucks stuff. Some may not notice, but I for one knew how great Buck really was, first as a musician, then as an artist."

"I can only give the entire project a big ole double, thumbs up," he said. "Well done guys, the West Coast takes a bow."

Songs are:
1. Foolin' Around Buck Owens (Written by Harlan Howard and Buck Owens)
2. Branded Man Merle Haggard (Written by Merle Haggard)
3. Together Again Buck Owens (Written by Buck Owens)
4. The Bottle Let Me Down Merle Haggard (Written by Merle Haggard)
5. He Don't Deserve You Anymore Buck Owens (Written by Arty Lange and Buck Owens)
6. I Can't Be Myself Merle Haggard (Written by Merle Haggard)
7. Nobody's Fool But Yours Buck Owens (Written by Buck Owens)
8. Holding Things Together Merle Haggard (Written by Bob Trotten and Merle Haggard)
9. But I Do Buck Owens (Written by Tommy Collins)
10. The Fightin' Side Of Me Merle Haggard (Written by Merle Haggard)

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Live from Austin, TX
It was hard to find a more significant country artist through the 1960s than Buck Owens. With 21 number ones from 1963 ("Act Naturally," included here) and 1972, including a stretch of 14 in a row, Buck Owens was one of country music's biggest stars, bringing his slant on the Bakersfield Sound to stages, radio and television around the world. In this 1988 Austin City Limits program and nearing 60 years old, Owens appears comfortable with his stature as a torchbearer. »»»
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