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Opry, Southwest descend on NYC

Tuesday, September 24, 2013 – In celebration of the Grand Ole Opry's birthday and Country Music Month, the Opry and Southwest Airlines are flying some musicians from Nashville to the heart of New York City for a series of free acoustic performances at the Southwest Porch at Bryant Park.

Nashville's New Music in New York will feature Tyler Farr, Love and Theft and Cassadee Pope. To set the tone, the Opry's signature microphone stand and a replica of the famed circle of wood from center stage at the Opry House will also be making the trip.

Farr will perform Sept. 30; Love and Theft Oct. 3; and Pope, Oct. 7. Air personalities from New York's NASH FM 94.7 will host each event. Each performance is open to the public and will be based on a first-come first-served basis. Other guests will be invited to be a part of each performance in the park outside the perimeter of the Southwest Porch.

"We're looking forward to presenting to our friends and fans in New York some of the artists who've really excited our audiences during recent Opry performances," said Pete Fisher, Opry vice president and general manager. "It'll be great to extend our birthday party and Country Music Month beyond Music City to New York City."

Full schedule details as well as a chance to win a VIP trip to Nashville including airfare on Southwest Airlines and admission to numerous Nashville attractions can be found at opry.com/nyc.

The Opry will officially celebrate with its 88th birthday in Nashville Oct. 4-5.

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