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Dot Records resurfaces

Monday, March 24, 2014 – Dot Records is back,

Big Machine Label Group President/CEOScott Borchetta and New York-headquartered Republic Records CEO Monte Lipman announced today a joint venture to revive multi-genre label.

No artists were named to the label. Industry veteran Chris Stacey will become general manager of the label. He most recently was senior vice president and head of promotion at Warner Music Nashville. He has a 20-year career working with acts across various genres such as Bob Dylan, Coldplay, Counting Crows, John Mayer, Joss Stone, Shania Twain, Blake Shelton, Hunter Hayes and Willie Nelson.

Borchetta and Lipman's previously created joint venture, Republic Nashville, was founded in 2005 and remains under the BMLG umbrella in Nashville. Similarly, Dot Records will be located on Music Row and will utilize the combined resources of Big Machine and Republic Records.

In 1950, electrical appliance store owner Randy Wood founded Dot Records just outside Nashville in Gallatin, Tenn. Wood's entry into the music business began when he started to sell classical and pop records in his store, Randy's, and soon noticed that his customers were more interested in purchasing records of the artists they were hearing on the local Nashville radio station WLAC.

As a result, Wood created a mail-order record business and renamed his store Randy's Record Shop. His passion for delivering great music to his customers inspired him to take his business one step further in which he decided to become part-owner of a local daytime-only radio station. When the day's broadcast would come to a close, Wood brought local talent into the station's studio, recording original music that led to Dot Records.

Dot became known for producing music that spanned genres, ranging from country to pop to R&B and bluegrass. More than 100 artists released music on Dot Records from 1950 to 1978 including Barbara Mandrell, Pat Boone, Roy Clark, The Fontane Sisters, The Surfaris ("Walk Don't Run"), Freddy Fender and Lawrence Welk.

The original Dot Records catalogue is now owned by the Universal Music Group, parent company of Republic Records.

"The first question we will get is 'why start another imprint?' The answer, quite simply, is 'it's time!'. We are again at the dawn of change in the music industry," said Borchetta. "When we started Big Machine in 2005 we were at the very beginning of artists properly utilizing social media to cut through the noise and engage fans. Today, that is not news by any stretch, it's part of every day life and as we transition into different digital models, hitting the reset button with another great executive, Chris Stacey, and reactivating the great Dot Records brand makes all the sense in the world. New executive strength and vision and the ability to sign new and exciting artists has always been the culture of the Big Machine Label Group. This is a very exciting day."

"This is the opportunity of a lifetime for me. To be able to create a brand new label under the BMLG umbrella with all of their resources is a dream come true," said Stacey. "The chance to team up with Scott and Monte and Avery is what every record exec dreams of. To have the freedom of an independent label with the global capabilities of a major is truly the best of both worlds. I am proud to lead the charge of taking the historic Dot brand and turning it into a force in today's new model music business."

Republic Nashville launched Florida Georgia Line, The Band Perry, Eli Young Band and Cassadee Pope. Big Machine is home to Taylor Swift.

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