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Womack finally returns to action

Thursday, April 10, 2014 – The long wait for new music from Lee Ann Womack is over. Sugar Hill announced today that it had signed the singer and will release her next album in September.

Womack's last studio disc was "Call Me Crazy" in 2008, her seventh studio album. In April 2012, Womack announced plans to release "The Way I'm Living," but by August 2012, she split with MCA Nashville.

"When I was looking for the right home for this record," Womack said, "I knew I wanted a label where passion for music and artistic integrity drive the decision-making, the people who bring the music to the fans. Beyond the incredible work Sugar Hill has done with Nickel Creek, Sarah Jarosz and Bryan Sutton, they have a broader way of looking at where music can go and why it matters - and for this very personal record, it seemed like the perfect fit."

"I have always loved country music with my entire being," saidWomack, "and I think the gift of a genre that's built on real life is that there is always room for great songs, and the truth. When we started this record, Frank and I promised each other we would only cut songs that we absolutely loved for no reason other than we loved them very much. No other factors, and I think that freedom really inspired us."

Frank Liddell - known for his work with Chris Knight, Pistol Annies, David Nail and also Womack's husband - produced. Beyond winning the Country Music Association's Album of the Year award in 2010 for Miranda Lambert's "Revolution," his work earned Lambert the Academy of Country Music Award's Album of the Year for three consecutive recordings: "Revolution," "Crazy Ex Girlfriend" and "Four The Record."

"Lee Ann and I always thought one day we'd work together," Liddell said, "but we wanted it to be right, be something we could both bring the best of ourselves, too. My wife is one of the greatest country singers ever, but she's also a vocalist who brings things out of songs you never realized were there. It's unusual for the musicians to not just want, but to shape their performances to the vocalist during tracking, but for this project... That's just what some of the best players in the world did."

Cliff O'Sullivan, Sugar Hill's General Manager and Senior Vice President, said, "We're thrilled to have Lee Ann join Sugar Hill and the Welk Music Group. She has delivered a stunning album, and we can't wait for people to hear it. Lee Ann turns an important artistic corner with this project, and we're delighted to be a part of her next chapter. Where Lee Ann wants to go musically matches up perfectly with our goals as a label."

Womack has enjoyed many hits, including "I Hope You Dancel" and "Mendocino County Line" with Willie Nelson.

Working with a core band that included a rhythm section of Matt Chamberlin on drums and Glen Worf, guitarist Duke Levine, acoustic guitarist/pianist Mac McAnally and steel player Paul Frankin, the project was recorded live on the floor with minimal overdubs.

Womack, a Texas native, has had seven songs make the top 10 in her career. But her last one was "I May Hate Myself in the Morning" from 2004.

More news for Lee Ann Womack

CD reviews for Lee Ann Womack

The Lonely, The Lonesome & The Gone CD review - The Lonely, The Lonesome & The Gone
Having made the transition from hit-maker to casual country chanteuse, and finally, to Americana minstrel, Lee Ann Womack offers up her most engaging effort yet, "The Lonely, The Lonesome & The Gone," an album whose evocative title effectively sums up the sentiments of each of the songs it shares. Womack may not have written all the material contained herein, but she's responsible for a fair percentage, and even those she didn't pen feel as personal as they are poignant. »»»
The Way I'm Livin' CD review - The Way I'm Livin'
Six years later, Lee Ann Womack is finally back. Her traditional country sounds were not quite working with Nashville, which was veering increasingly pop. Now, the Texas native returns with a new label, but the same lovely voice. Originally intended for her old label, MCA Nashville, Womack was given the marching orders to make the type of disc she wanted to listen to. That resulted in songs from the likes of Neil Young, several from Bruce Robison, Adam Wright and Natalie Hemby, several of whom »»»
Call Me Crazy CD review - Call Me Crazy
The title track of Lee Ann Womack's first CD since 2005's traditional masterpiece "There's More Where That Came From" should have been the name of that CD because "There's More" was a real risk taker. Womack did wonders with the material there. While not quite the same left field beauty, Womack puts out another excellent batch of music three years later. The songs work best when Womack opts for the traditional approach. Womack is on the top of her game on »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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