Bentley opts for the moonshine

Friday, May 9, 2014 – Dierks Bentley and Ole Smoky Tennessee Moonshine announced today that they will join forces in a multi-year partnership across tour, media and digital platforms

At the stawrt of Bentley's Riser tour tonight in Charlotte, NC, the moonshine maker will provide a tailgate party for fans in a throwback 1920's style saloon with a modern country vibe featuring Ole Smoky drinks, music and specialty merchandise at participating venues.

"When I first moved to Nashville, I lived down at the Station Inn and really dove head first into the bluegrass community...I used to beg my way into pickin parties with those guys because I was eaten up with that sound and that lifestyle. And when you surround yourself with banjos and fiddles, there's bound to be some shine there too," said Bentley. "All of that influenced who I am and the music I make today. Ole Smoky is a great partner for me and my fans out on the Riser tour this year...they're going to help us get the party started early out in the parking lot and set the tone for a rowdy night."

"We are thrilled to be launching our partnership with Dierks Bentley as he starts the Riser tour," said Joe Baker, founder of Ole Smoky Moonshine. "Just like Ole Smoky, the tour is about bringing people together who love country music and having fun. We can't wait to see the fans dancing, laughing and sharing their stories over our moonshine."

More news for Dierks Bentley

CD reviews for Dierks Bentley

Black CD review - Black
Dierks Bentley seems intent on expanding his musical boundaries, but he may have overreached too much in eschewing where he came from. That most evident by the dominating textured beats. Producer Ross Copperman and Bentley seem hell bent on injecting odd meters and sounds, sharp detours from past efforts. Unfortunately, the atmospheric beats muddy up the vocal delivery on "Freedom," a song that stretches far too long at almost four minutes. Bentley also channels U2 with its »»»
Riser CD review - Riser
Change was in store for Dierks Bentley when it came to recording his seventh album, "Riser." On the personal front, he lost his father and added to his family, clearly affecting the subject matter of his latest. On the musical front, he traded long-time producer Brett Beavers, producer of every disc except "Up on the Ridge," for Ross Copperman, who has enjoyed more success as a writer, including several previous tracks for Bentley. Bentley embraces current trends in country »»»
Up on the Ridge CD review - Up on the Ridge
Dierks Bentley takes a left, turn, sort of, on his fifth studio disc. Bentley has built a solid reputation as a country artist with a slew of hits and catchy songs with edge. But here, Bentley goes bluegrass or at least 12 songs steeped in that sound. This is nothing new for Bentley, who previously has recorded bluegrass songs. Much to his credit, Bentley does not come off as a dilettante, but, instead, someone who feels comfortable with the music from the lead-off title track to the closing sad »»»