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Americanafest NYC features Harris, Crowell, Cash

Monday, July 21, 2014 – Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell, Jim Lauderdale, Buddy Miller and Rosanne Cash will be among the artists playing at next month's free Americanafest NYC, a music and film experience taking place Aug. 4-10.

The Americana Music Association and Lincoln Center have partnered for the first time to present the festival during Lincoln Center's popular free summer music program, Out of Doors, now in its 44th season.

Americanafest NYC will present concerts by folk, bluegrass, country, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and R&B performers. Film screenings, a related photo exhibition by Music Maker Relief Foundation and a symposium exploring the elders and their legacies finding new expression among younger generations of musicians will be offered as well.

"We're thrilled to partner with the American Music Association this summer," said Jill Sternheimer, producer, Public Programming for Lincoln Center. "The organization, led by Jed Hilly, is at the epicenter of a vital movement bringing together new voices, celebrated icons and eager audiences. Our initial thought was for Americana to be represented at our annual Roots of American Music weekend but we realized that this music is such a part of the country's cultural canon, that a full week of programming was the way to go."

"After receiving the invitation from Lincoln Center to co-curate this event, my first call was to invite Rodney Crowell and Emmylou Harris, who've been champions of our cause," said Jed Hilly, executive director of the Americana Music Association. "Rodney called me back within minutes and said, 'Let's do it.' We are truly humbled by artists' support and the acknowledgement of our work by America's greatest cultural institution, Lincoln Center."

All events are free with no tickets required. Events take place on Lincoln Center's Plazas between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenues, from West 62nd Street to West 65th Street (except where noted).

The schedule is:

Wednesday, Aug. 6, 7:30 p.m. at Damrosch Park Bandshell
Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell and Robert Ellis

Thursday, Aug. 7, 7:30 p.m. at David Rubenstein Atrium
Tift Merritt with Eric Heywood

Friday, Aug. 8, 7:30 p.m. at Damrosch Park Bandshell
Cassandra Wilson, The Campbell Brothers: A Sacred Steel Love Supreme (World Premiere; 50th anniversary celebration of John Coltrane's A Love Supreme commissioned by Lincoln Center Out of Doors)
Featuring visuals by Brock Monroe, Joshua Light Show collaborator

Saturday, Aug. 9, 1 p.m. at Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater
Heroes of American Roots: From the Historic Films Archives
1:30 PM at Hearst Plaza
Old 97's, The Devil Makes Three and John Fullbright
4 p.m. at Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center Amphitheater
Heroes of American Roots: From the Historic Films Archives
6 pm. - Damrosch Park Bandshell
Rosanne Cash, The Lone Bellow and Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale

Sunday, Aug. 10 at 1 p.m. at David Rubenstein Atrium
Symposium: Heroes of American Roots: From the Historic Films Archives introduced by Joe Lauro
5 p.m. at Damroch Park Bandshell
Charles Bradley & His Extraordinnaires, St. Paul & the Broken Bones and Bobby Patterson
Music Maker Blues Revue* featuring Dom Flemons, Beverly "Guitar" Watkins, and Ironing Board Sam

* Related Exhibition
July 9-Aug. 29 at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center and Corridor Gallery
We Are the Music Makers Exhibition hours: 12-8 Monday and Thursday; 12-6 Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday. Closed Sunday.

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