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MPR bleeps Fulks

Monday, February 2, 2015Star Tribune.

Fulks' appeared live on Saturday night for a broadcast on Sunday on Minnesota Public Radio and sang "Where I Fell," Near the end of the song, Fulks sings, "And it's the same sad crew at Delilah shouting over the redneck band/Game score, tea party, world war, I don't give a good goddamn."

Prior to the rebroadcast of the Garrison Keillor show on Sunday, an apology was aired with the word bleeped from the recording. The show had issued a language advisory soon after Saturday's live broadcast to about 670 stations.

The Star Tribune story quoted MPR spokeswoman Angie Andresen as saying the decision to bleep the word "is something we do on occasion with certain words, especially when children are likely to be listening with their families."

Fulks, who has a sharp wit, seemed to not so subtlly address the controversy in a web site posting today. He gave the title "tonight's goddamn show" to his posting that despite the heavy snow in Chicago on Sunday, "I thought I had better affirm that we are indeed plowing ahead with tonight's presentation at the fabled Hideout."

More news for Robbie Fulks

CD reviews for Robbie Fulks

Upland Stories CD review - Upland Stories
Twenty years ago, Robbie Fulks became a beloved alt.-country figure by writing modern honky tonk and country songs that rose above the work of many other contemporary traditionalists thanks to a combination of sharp wit and engaging storytelling. In 2013, Fulks gained critical acclaim for "Gone Away Backward," an album that took a deeper dive into history by embracing the traditional Appalachian folk music that proved to be country music's bedrock. That exploration continues with »»»
Gone Away Backward CD review - Gone Away Backward
Robbie Fulks is going backwards in more ways that one - not that that's a negative. For starters, he's back with Bloodshot - the label where he released four of his first six albums, but none since "13 Hillbilly Giants' in 2001. Also evident of his coming home feel is that he may hearken back even further to his time with bluegrass band Special Consensus as Fulks opts for an acoustic, often bluegrass sound, sometimes country or folk on these dozen songs. »»»
Revenge! CD review - Revenge!
With a highly regarded live show, it's about time Robbie Fulks finally put out a record of it. Actually, this is a 2-disc, 23-track record that brings together two performances from last year. The first disc, recorded in Champaign, Ill., with Fulks' excellent road band, starts with the new and very funny "We're On the Road," which gets things off to a good-natured, goofy start complete with a fake call from Yep Roc's head telling him he's past due for a new release. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Evans brings the cheer – What's a country song without drinking? Morgan Evans seems to have gotten the missive loud and clear as a good chunk of his songs incorporate libations into the mix. And when the Australian-bred singer isn't confronting drinking, he's dealing with matters of the heart, but in keeping with the positive attitude he purveyed, love is most... »»»
Concert Review: Lambert smiles, dances the night away – Miranda Lambert didn't perform "Tin Man," one of her best, but also one of her saddest songs during this Wildcard tour stop. It's a song sung from the perspective of one who is sad that she has a heart that can be broken. That's not the current condition of Lambert's heart, though. She's apparently in a good... »»»
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