Moore skate project gains steam

Wednesday, June 3, 2015 – Kip Moore announced plans today for his "Comeback Kid Skatepark Project," a charitable initiative that will oversee the construction of a series of skateparks to benefit communities and kids.

At a press conference today, Moore along with Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and Salemtown Board Co, revealed the phase one cities of the project including Nashville, Boston, San Marcos and Annapolis, Md. The inspiration for the name of the project comes from "Comeback Kid," a personal anthem from Moore's upcoming album "Wild Ones."

"What started off as a pipe dream of mine years ago, has truly become a passion project," said Moore. "It came from me wanting to give kids in inner cities a safe outlet, where they can form the bonds I know can be made from having somewhere awesome to go and be a part of something they enjoy. I wrote the song 'Comeback Kid' at a time when I felt like a comeback kid, but now when I sing it I think less about myself and more about the kids we are doing this for and how much I admire and respect them. We're starting with these four cities, but the plan is to keep growing this as far and wide as we can."

Each park will have a unique design to provide the first step for anyone of any age to learn how to skate. Most skate spots will range from 1,500 to 3,000 square feet and will include elements such as quarter pipe, bank-to-curb, hubba ledges, hand rail and step up. Most of the phase one skateparks will be up and running by this fall.

The "Comback Kid Skatepark Project" is the first initiative of "Kip's Kids Fund," a donor-advised fund through The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee (CFMT) focused on youth and teens. As an avid rock climber, surfer, skateboarder and outdoor enthusiast, Moore has been drawn to the outdoors and alternative sports for much of his life.

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CD reviews for Kip Moore

Wild World CD review - Wild World
There are moments while listening to Kip Moore's album where the listener might feel like he/she is sampling new Kid Rock music - albeit, with plenty more heart and soul. Moore sings with a similarly endearing scratchy vocal tone, and has a primarily country music fan base, but that's where these two artists part ways artistically. Whereas Kid Rock mostly raises hell, Moore raises awareness. Kid Rock might be perfectly comfortable singing about his dark side, but Moore is heard »»»
Room To Spare: The Acoustic Sessions CD review - Room To Spare: The Acoustic Sessions
Kip Moore's greatest musical selling point is his raspy singing voice. Much like Bob Seger long before him, his is a vocal tone that gets your immediate attention every time you hear it. This EP-length project presents Moore in a quieter setting than usual. That distinctive voice is unavoidable, though, whether revved up or tamped down. The song that stands out most is "It Ain't California," which is introduced with a beautifully twangy electric guitar riff. »»»
Slowheart CD review - Slowheart
If you're one of those people who read CD inserts before listening to the music, Kip Moore starts out with one at least one strike against him on his third album. In the two pages of acknowledgements and thank yous (two pages!) there's this mixed metaphor on thank you number one, which goes out to Jesus: "You continually pull me from the sinking sand. . . I'm out of the woods because of your love." Um, not a lot of sand in the woods, Kip. Thankfully, things get better as »»»