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Mountain Fever signs Nothin' Fancy

Monday, July 27, 2015 – Nothin' Fancy signed with Mountain Fever Records, the label announced Monday. The band will begin work on their debut project for the label in August.

From the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia, Nothin' Fancy is comprised of founding members Mike Andes on mandolin, Mitchell Davis on banjo, Chris Sexton on fiddle, Tony Shorter on bass and newest member, Caleb Cox on guitar.

The band formed in 1994 to compete in a bluegrass competition. Since then, it has released 11 full length albums. Nothin' Fancy is the 6-time winner of SPBGMA's Entertaining Group of the Year, a fan voted award, and have successfully hosted the Nothin' Fancy Bluegrass Festival since 2001 in Buena Vista, Va.

This fall, the band will be inducted into the Virginia Country Music Hall of Fame, joining a list of previous inductees including Roy Clark, The Statler Brothers, Charlie Waller and Dr. Ralph Stanley.

"Nothin' Fancy has been a near staple of the bluegrass business in the U.S. for over 20 years but they are much more than a bluegrass band," said Mark Hodges, president of Mountain Fever Records. "These guys entertain and command your attention every moment they are on stage and their music and comedy combine to make every show an event. We're thrilled to add them to the Mountain Fever roster of great talent."

"We are excited and honored to be in the ranks of the great bands that Mark has brought together under the Mountain Fever banner," said Sexton. "We know that Mountain Fever has a great reputation with very accomplished bands, and we are looking forward to the collaborations to come with our new Mountain Fever family."

"I am very excited for Nothin' Fancy to be on the Mountain Fever label," said Andes. "This is where we need to be, and I look forward to reaching the new goals that lie ahead."

Nothin' Fancy will begin recording their debut album next month with Aaron Ramsey slated to co-produce with Mark Hodges.

CD reviews for Nothin' Fancy

It's a Good Feeling CD review - It's a Good Feeling
Looking back at the longevity of Nothin' Fancy and the footprint it has left and is still leaving on the world of bluegrass music gives Mike Andes quite a good feeling. As a founding member, he has seen changes in the music as well as changes in the band, but the feeling remains the same. Newer members Caleb and James Cox (guitar and bass, respectively) get to play with such good friends, a sentiment Mitchell Davis (banjo) and Chris Sexton (fiddle) share as well, making "It's A Good »»»
Where I Came From CD review - Where I Came From
"Where I Came From" by the Virginia-based bluegrass quintet Nothin' Fancy is the sound of a bluegrass band both looking back on its 22-plus-year career and its musical heritage while also striving to advance the art form by creating its own path. Reflection here comes in two forms - new songs looking back and covers of songs that helped shape and influence the band and its sound. The title track is an example of the former. Penned by Mike Andes, who plays mandolin and provides »»»
Lord Bless This House CD review - Lord Bless This House
The cover art and banjo kick off opener leave no doubt that this is a bluegrass gospel CD. The instrumentation is traditional acoustic with guitar, bass, mandolin and fiddle, and the harmonies are standard three part. The playing is solid and pleasant, but not flashy. The 'Scruggs style' finger-picked guitar on God's Heavenly Shore is especially effective. This is a traditional recording, but there are some surprises. Lead vocals tend to a somewhat lower register »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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