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Kid Rock headlines WE Fest

Wednesday, October 14, 2015 – Kid Rock is the third headliner for the 34th Annual WE Fest in Detroit Lakes, Minn. next August, it was announced today.

Kid Rock joins previously announced headliners, Eric Church and Tim McGraw for the fest, being held Aug. 4-6.

Kid Rock last took the stage at the Soo Pass Ranch in 2010, performing on the same night as Church. His return to WE Fest comes on the heals of his new album, "First ."

"Kid Rock is a great addition to this year's lineup, and we're happy to welcome him back to the Ranch," said Bob Bliss, WE Fest General Manager. "Our goal is to offer something for every country music lover - classic country, country rock, new country - it's what our fans love about WE Fest and what makes it such a great party every year."

WE Fest 2016 tickets are available now. Prices for 3-day general admission tickets start at $129; reserve tickets start at $135; and VIP packages start at $700. For more info, visit wefest.com or call 800-493-3378.

More news for Kid Rock

CD reviews for Kid Rock

Sweet Southern Sugar CD review - Sweet Southern Sugar
Kid Rock ended his association with Warner Brothers Records and moved to the Nashville-based BBR Records (a division of BMG), home of stars like Jason Aldean and Trace Adkins, and the name of the album certainly evokes Dixie, but that doesn't necessarily mean he's morphing into Kid Country. After all, his lengthy Wikipedia page lists several eras in the man's career - the hip-hop era, the rap-rock era, the heartland rock era, et cetera - and there's no reason to think that this »»»
Born Free CD review - Born Free
No popular act today surveys the country's musical landscape quite like Kid Rock. He came to us as a rap ringmaster, evolved into Bob Seger's soul-shuffle, and finally channeled the spirits of Bocephus, Cash and Waylon. On "Born Free," Rock finally arrives at the Nashville-by-way-of-Detroit destination he's been aiming at for the last 15 years. It's a satisfying set, with feel-good songs and workingman laments that still sound breezy. One definite highlight is the »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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