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Simpson maps out "A Sailor's Guide to Earth"

Friday, March 4, 2016 – Sturgill Simpson will release his major label debut, "A Sailor's Guide to Earth" on April 15 on Atlantic.

The first single, "Brace For Impact (Live A Little)," is premiering today and can be heard at Simpson's web site.

Simpson, 38, will kick off his 2016 tour this spring, including shows in Austin, Dallas, Houston, Chicago, Milwaukee and Minneapolis. Tickets go on-sale Friday, March 11.

Produced by Simpson, who has a Waylon Jennings vibe, the disc was a letter to his first child who arrived during the summer of 2014 and features eight original songs as well as a rendition of Nirvana's "In Bloom."

Recorded primarily at Nashville's The Butcher Shoppe, the Kentucky natived was joined in the studio by engineer David Ferguson (Johnny Cash, John Prine, "Cowboy" Jack Clement) and assistant engineer Sean Sullivan. Along with members of his touring band, the album features Dave Roe on bass, Dan Dugmore on steel guitar, Dougie Wilkinson on bagpipes, Garo Yellin and Arthur Cook on cello, Jonathan Dinklage and Whitney LaGrange on violin and special guests The Dap Kings.

"A Sailor's Guide To Earth" is Simpson's third full-length album and follows his break-through, Grammy-nominated 2014 release, "Metamodern Sounds In Country Music," which was produced by Dave Cobb. He also produced Simpson's debut, "High Top Mountain," in 2013.

The track listing is:
1. Welcome to Earth (Pollywog)
2. Breakers Roar
3. Keep It Between The Lines
4. Sea Stories
5. In Bloom
6. Brace For Impact (Live A Little)
7. All Around You
8. Oh Sarah
9. Call To Arms

Tour dates are:
May 5-6 -Austin, TX-Austin City Limits Live at the Moody Theater
May 7-Dallas, TX-The Bomb Factory
May 10-Houston, TX-White Oak Music Hall
May 11-Oklahoma City, OK-Criterion Theater
May 16-17-Lexington, KY- Lexington Opera House
May 18-Chattanooga, TN-Tivoli Theater
May 20-Knoxville, TN-Tennessee Theater
May 21-Indianapolis, IN-Egyptian Room - Old National Centre
May 22-Louisville, KY-Louisville Palace
June 2-Royal Oak, MI-Royal Oak Theatre
June 3-Chicago, IL-Riviera Theatre
June 4-Milwaukee, WI-Riverside Theater
June 5-Minneapolis, MN-First Avenue

Additional dates to be announced.

More news for Sturgill Simpson

CD reviews for Sturgill Simpson

A Soldier's Guide to Earth CD review - A Soldier's Guide to Earth
If scratching your head about the sounds emanating from Sturgill Simpson's third release, then "It Ain't All Flowers" from his last release, the excellent "Metamodern Sounds in Country Music," ought to serve as a reference point. In a disc filled with traditional country sounds, "Flowers" was about as far away as one could get with the electronics sounding so completely disjointed from everything else on the release. Put it this way - " Islands" »»»
Metamodern Sounds in Country Music CD review - Metamodern Sounds in Country Music
The first time you hear Sturgill sing you may feel like you've heard a ghost - the ghost of Waylon Jennings, that is. Although his voice isn't as low as Jennings' was, it's nevertheless still in the same general vocal range ballpark. Better still, the Kentucky native sings wonderfully honest country songs. "Life of Sin," for instance, is a song about, well, sinning, which is really some of what great country is all about. Yes, most of this album will do a »»»
High Top Mountain CD review - High Top Mountain
There's not a whole lot of traditional troubadours around these days. Old school may still be appreciated, but when it comes to country crossovers and reaching the masses, it's roots rock, alt.-country and Americana that hold the upper hand. Which makes it surprising in a way that newcomer Sturgill Simpson should sound like such a, well, old-timer. Hell, even his name resembles the kind of handle aptly suited to a country crooner. It's little wonder then that his debut disc, »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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