Bentley shoots "The Moon"

Friday, April 1, 2016 – Following this week's announcement of his eighth studio album "Black," (Capitol Records Nashville), Dierks Bentley premiered today the first of a short film series based on several of the album's songs through Rolling Stone.

Set to the track of "I'll Be The Moon" (featuring Maren Morris), Bentley teamed with longtime director Wes Edwards for the first episode. The modern day film noir establishes a love triangle guided by the destructive power of steamy secrets. iTunes will mirror the series by offering instant downloads of each episode's featured track from "Black."

"'I'll Be The Moon' is a pivotal part of the flow of this record and is where the storyline of the couple in this series begins," said Bentley. "We first recorded it just me, but the song looks at a relationship from a different angle, where the girl is instigating the deceit. So, I felt like it needed a female voice, and I started to hear it more as a duet. I love the perspective Maren adds, there's weight to her voice."

The lead single, "Somewhere On A Beach," is in the Top 10. For the first time, Bentley will co-host the 51st Annual ACM Awards this Sunday at 8 p.m. eastern on CBS. Bentley launches his 2016 Somewhere on a Beach Tour with Randy Houser, Cam and Tucker Beathard beginning May 12 in Holmdel, N.J.

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CD reviews for Dierks Bentley

Black CD review - Black
Dierks Bentley seems intent on expanding his musical boundaries, but he may have overreached too much in eschewing where he came from. That most evident by the dominating textured beats. Producer Ross Copperman and Bentley seem hell bent on injecting odd meters and sounds, sharp detours from past efforts. Unfortunately, the atmospheric beats muddy up the vocal delivery on "Freedom," a song that stretches far too long at almost four minutes. Bentley also channels U2 with its »»»
Riser CD review - Riser
Change was in store for Dierks Bentley when it came to recording his seventh album, "Riser." On the personal front, he lost his father and added to his family, clearly affecting the subject matter of his latest. On the musical front, he traded long-time producer Brett Beavers, producer of every disc except "Up on the Ridge," for Ross Copperman, who has enjoyed more success as a writer, including several previous tracks for Bentley. Bentley embraces current trends in country »»»
Up on the Ridge CD review - Up on the Ridge
Dierks Bentley takes a left, turn, sort of, on his fifth studio disc. Bentley has built a solid reputation as a country artist with a slew of hits and catchy songs with edge. But here, Bentley goes bluegrass or at least 12 songs steeped in that sound. This is nothing new for Bentley, who previously has recorded bluegrass songs. Much to his credit, Bentley does not come off as a dilettante, but, instead, someone who feels comfortable with the music from the lead-off title track to the closing sad »»»