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Simpson, McCoury release new music

Friday, April 15, 2016 – Sturgill Simpson gained much acclaim with 2014's "Metamodern Sounds in Country Music." His brand new "A Soldier's Guide to Earth" finds him on a new label (Atlantic) and different sounds. This is not particularly steeped in country, although it is around the edges. Simpson also gets a bit more bluesy and foul on the disc, which was written as a themed disc to his son who was born in the summer of 2014. Simpson self-produced the nine songs, taking over for Dave Cobb.

Woody Guthrie died in 1967, but new music - in part from him - is still being released. "Del and Woody" is out today from Del McCoury. The disc combines song lyrics from Guthrie and music from McCoury, who keeps it bluegrass. McCoury produced the dozen-song release with the Del McCoury Band providing the music.

Bluegrass singer Joe Mullins & The Radio Ramblers is out with "Sacred Memories," a bluegrass gospel project. Ricky Skaggs, Sharon White Skaggs, Rhonda Vincent and The Isaacs all appear on the dozen-song disc. This is the group's first Christian-themed project since 2011's "Hymns From The Hills."

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CD reviews for Sturgill Simpson

A Soldier's Guide to Earth CD review - A Soldier's Guide to Earth
If scratching your head about the sounds emanating from Sturgill Simpson's third release, then "It Ain't All Flowers" from his last release, the excellent "Metamodern Sounds in Country Music," ought to serve as a reference point. In a disc filled with traditional country sounds, "Flowers" was about as far away as one could get with the electronics sounding so completely disjointed from everything else on the release. Put it this way - " Islands" »»»
Metamodern Sounds in Country Music CD review - Metamodern Sounds in Country Music
The first time you hear Sturgill sing you may feel like you've heard a ghost - the ghost of Waylon Jennings, that is. Although his voice isn't as low as Jennings' was, it's nevertheless still in the same general vocal range ballpark. Better still, the Kentucky native sings wonderfully honest country songs. "Life of Sin," for instance, is a song about, well, sinning, which is really some of what great country is all about. Yes, most of this album will do a »»»
High Top Mountain CD review - High Top Mountain
There's not a whole lot of traditional troubadours around these days. Old school may still be appreciated, but when it comes to country crossovers and reaching the masses, it's roots rock, alt.-country and Americana that hold the upper hand. Which makes it surprising in a way that newcomer Sturgill Simpson should sound like such a, well, old-timer. Hell, even his name resembles the kind of handle aptly suited to a country crooner. It's little wonder then that his debut disc, »»»