Bentley finds himself "Somewhere" at the top

Tuesday, April 19, 2016 – Dierks Bentley jumped to the top of the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart for the week ending April 30 with "Somewhere on a Beach." Bentley, who was fourth last week, took over for Tim McGraw's "Humble and Kind," which fell to second. Chris Stapleton was first on the Top Country Albums chart with "Traveller."

On the songs chart, Cole Swindell held third with "You Should Be Here." Chris Young's duet with Cassadee Pope, "Think of You," was fourth, one ahead of Thomas Rhett's uber hit "Die a Happy Man."

Rascal Flatts was up four to eighth with "I Like the Sound of That." Luke Bryan's "Huntin', Fishin' & Lovin' Every Day" was up 3 to 11th. Lee Brice was 13th with "That Don't Sound Like You," which moved up three. Dustin Lynch went from 19 to 15 with "Mind Reader." Chris Lane closed out the top 25 with "Fix," up 1.

On the albums chart, Joey + Rory was second with "Hymns," Carrie Underwood third with "Storyteller," Rhett fourth with "Tangled Up" and Sam Hunt fifth with "Montevallo." Bryan was sixth with "Kill the Lights," up three.

The death of Merle Haggard resulted in his disc with Willie Nelson, "Django And Jimmie," up 20 to 9. Margo Price jumped 8 to 11 with "Midwest Farmer's Daughter." Underwood's "Greatest Hits: Decade #1" jumped from 23 to 12. Kane Brown was at 21 with "Chapter 1," which had been 26th. Brantley Gilbert saw "Just As I Am" go from 28 to 24.

On the Bluegrass Albums chart, Steve Martin and Edie Brickell were first with "So Familiar." The Steeldrivers held second with "The Muscle Shoals Recordings." Steep Canyon Rangers was third with "Radio," one ahead of Dailey & Vincent's "Alive! In Concert." The Infamous Stringdusters jumped from 12 to 5 with "Ladies & Gentlemen."

On the Billboard top 200, Stapleton was 3rd, Joey + Rory 16th, Rhett 24th, Hunt 27th and Underwood 31st. The top 200 and country albums chart utilize different critera.

More news for Dierks Bentley

CD reviews for Dierks Bentley

Black CD review - Black
Dierks Bentley seems intent on expanding his musical boundaries, but he may have overreached too much in eschewing where he came from. That most evident by the dominating textured beats. Producer Ross Copperman and Bentley seem hell bent on injecting odd meters and sounds, sharp detours from past efforts. Unfortunately, the atmospheric beats muddy up the vocal delivery on "Freedom," a song that stretches far too long at almost four minutes. Bentley also channels U2 with its »»»
Riser CD review - Riser
Change was in store for Dierks Bentley when it came to recording his seventh album, "Riser." On the personal front, he lost his father and added to his family, clearly affecting the subject matter of his latest. On the musical front, he traded long-time producer Brett Beavers, producer of every disc except "Up on the Ridge," for Ross Copperman, who has enjoyed more success as a writer, including several previous tracks for Bentley. Bentley embraces current trends in country »»»
Up on the Ridge CD review - Up on the Ridge
Dierks Bentley takes a left, turn, sort of, on his fifth studio disc. Bentley has built a solid reputation as a country artist with a slew of hits and catchy songs with edge. But here, Bentley goes bluegrass or at least 12 songs steeped in that sound. This is nothing new for Bentley, who previously has recorded bluegrass songs. Much to his credit, Bentley does not come off as a dilettante, but, instead, someone who feels comfortable with the music from the lead-off title track to the closing sad »»»