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Winslow-King is "Glad" about "Trouble"

Wednesday, July 6, 2016 – New Orleans-based musician Luke Winslow-King will combine his roots, blues and jazzy sounds on his third Bloodshot Records release, "I'm Glad Trouble Don't Last Always," coming Sept. 30.

Winslow-King also covers sounds of New Orleans, Delta blues, Memphis R&B and Chicago blues.

Winslow-King wrote and recorded while he and his newly formed band were on a 2015 summer tour in Italy (and later finished in New Orleans's Parlor Studios, mixed by Colin DuPuis, engineer for the Black Keys) and during a period of heartbreak and divorce.

Through nine songs, Winslow-King stylistically offers a rock growl on "Louisiana Blues" a cowboy country campfire ballad "Heartsick Blues" with fiddle from Matt Rhody, the Petty-inflected "Change Your Mind."

The band consists of Italian guitarist Roberto Luti, drummer Benji Bohannon, electric bassist Brennan Andes and keyboardist Mike Lynch.

The disc will be Winslow-King's fifth overall.

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CD reviews for Luke Winslow-King

I'm Glad Trouble Don't Last Always CD review - I'm Glad Trouble Don't Last Always
If Ray Lamontagne was a little less pretentious and a lot more hip he'd echo the multi-threat, blues-country-rock stylings of Luke Winslow-King. With a little gravel in his voice, some poison and playfulness in his pen and a mean slide guitar at his fingertips, the Delta blues influence he honed during his time in New Orleans is clearly evident. But a deeper peek is like a trip from the upper Midwest south to the Gulf of Mexico. Winslow-King crafts a tasty blend of his Cadillac, Mich. »»»
Everlasting Arms CD review - Everlasting Arms
Much like the way the Creole people of Southern Louisiana brought together a wide variety of flavors, ingredients and spices to create gumbo, which is now the signature dish of New Orleans cuisine, singer/songwriter Luke Winslow-King has borrowed from many of the Americana music traditions closely associated with The Crescent City to produce an album that immediately transports listeners to the French Quarter. From gospel to jazz to acoustic Delta blues to ragtime, the sounds of New Orleans »»»
The Coming Tide CD review - The Coming Tide
Hailing from Cadillac, Mich., singer, songwriter, and guitarist Winslow-King has lived in New Orleans since 2001. Since living in the Big Easy, he's collaborated with a number of local musicians from John Boutte and "Washboard" Chaz Leary to Paul Sanchez. On this new album, he and his partner, singer/washboardist Esther Rose, deliver an electrifying blend of the sultry, dark, and celebratory rhythms of ragtime, jazz, blues, gospel, country and rock-and-roll that they've »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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