Black Music Matters Festival

Earle, Bare release new music

Friday, May 26, 2017 – Justin Townes Earle releases "Kids in the Street," his first album for New West. On his seventh album, Earle is working with a producer for the first time in his now decade-long career. Earle made the trip to Omaha, Neb. to be guided by Mike Mogis (First Aid Kit, M. Ward, Connor Oberst) at ARC Studios. The release includes a dozen songs.

Country Hall of Fame member Bobby Bare is not resting on his laurels at 81. Bare is out with "Things Change," a 10-song set., his first album in 5 years. Songs include a remake of one of his hits "Detroit City" with backing vocal help from Chris Stapleton. The song was written by Mel Tillis and Danny Dill and was originally released by Bare in 1963. Bare offers his version of Mary Gauthier's "I Drink."

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CD reviews for Justin Townes Earle

The Saint of Lost Causes CD review - The Saint of Lost Causes
When your Dad's Steve Earle and your namesake is Townes Van Zandt, you probably aren't destined to be a shoemaker. A native of Music City, Justin Townes Earle ate well from the horn of plenty that is the Nashville scene. He kicked around in some bands, but also generally raised a lot of hell. Around 2007, he started releasing albums regularly - "Saint of Lost Causes" is his eighth release and the first since 2017's critically well-received "Kids In the Street. »»»
Kids in the Street CD review - Kids in the Street
With "Kids In The Street," Justin Townes Earle moves comfortably between country, blues, folk and rock. The strongest country tunes are the traditional sounding weeper "What's She Crying For," featuring slick pedal steel guitar work from Paul Niehaus, and the catchy ballad "Faded Valentine," a sweetly melancholic tale of lost love that highlights producer Mike Mogis on mandolin. The nostalgic title track finds Earle reminiscing about his unspectacular childhood »»»
Absent Fathers CD review - Absent Fathers
Fans of the early Justin Townes Earle might be disappointed in the work that fills "Absent Fathers," his 2015 album that shows the once reckless outlaw-wannabe has grown up past the anger and found a home in therapeutic songwriting. For the rest of listeners, however, it's a cathartic and thought-provoking journey through his atonement, not with his muddy past, but instead with his own pain. Earle's voice hints of the same grittiness found in Black Keys front man Dan »»»