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Gayle announces new album, first in 16 years

Friday, July 19, 2019 – Crystal Gayle will drop her first new album in nearly 16 years, "You Don't Know Me" on Sept. 6.

Southpaw Musical Productions is putting out the album recorded and mixed by Gayle's son Christos Gatzimos. The collection finds Gayle covering the songs of artists including George Jones, Patsy Cline, Buck Owens and Eddy Arnold.

"This wasn't a stretch at all," said Gayle. "This project is a labor of love that my son, Christos, and I produced together. It is filled with country classics that I grew up singing. They are very much a part of my history, and I've been wanting to do this for a long time. I feel very lucky to have known and worked with many of the artists who had the original hits."

Each of the selections was chosen because it played a role in her musical development. Two of them point to the importance that her family had in bringing her to fame.

The opening track is "Ribbon Of Darkness," a song originally written by Gordon Lightfoot. Originally released in 1965 as a single by Marty Robbins, it became his 11th number one hit.

The song was the first one Gayle performed at her Grand Ole Opry debut.

"I was 16," said Gayle. "Loretta was sick. Mooney [Lynn] did something; I don't know what. But they let me sing in her place. In my early years in Nashville, when I was on Decca, I opened for Marty Robbins. So I've heard him sing this many times. Connie Smith also had a hit with it. So the night I was inducted into the Opry cast in 2017, I asked Connie if it was okay with her that I sing "Ribbon of Darkness."

"Crying Time" was originally written and recorded by Bakersfield sound pioneer Buck Owens. "I do a medley of Buck Owens songs in my shows," said Gayle. "When I was a kid, he worked Buck Lake Ranch in Indiana. I would go whenever he was playing there, and he'd let me sing on his show. When I was 16, he wanted me to become a regular on his TV show. He asked me, but it didn't work out."

The closing track is "Put It Off Until Tomorrow" which brings Gayle together with her sisters Peggy Sue Wright, and Loretta Lynn, for the first time. Dolly Parton wrote the song.

"Loretta and Peggy made this album very special by singing 'Put It Off Until Tomorrow' with me. It is a song that we have performed together throughout the years. This is the one and only trio performance on record. We've done the Boston Pops together. We performed together in Lake Tahoe and Reno and a few things like that. But we've never actually made a record together. Peggy Sue still comes out on the road with me, singing backup harmonies. I recorded the track, then Patsy, Loretta's daughter, asked her to sing on my album. Loretta is such an incredible singer. She got through the song right away and then went, "What's next?" We should have recorded the whole album together! Loretta had her stroke not long after we recorded this."

The track listing is:
1. Ribbon Of Darkness (Gordon Lightfoot)
2. You Win Again (Hank Williams)
3. Please Help Me I'm Falling (Don Robertson, Hal Blair)
4. Am I That Easy To Forget (Carl Belew, W.S. Stevenson, Shelby Singleton)
5. Hello Walls (Willie Nelson)
6. You Never Were Mine (Jay Lee Webb)
7. Just One More (George Jones)
8. There Goes My Everything (Dallas Frazier)
9. That's The Way Love Goes (Lefty Frizzell, Sanger D Shafer)
10. Cryin' Time (Buck Owens)
11. I've Seen That Look On Me A Thousand Times (Harlan Howard, Shirl Milete)
12. Walkin' After Midnight (Alan Block, Donn Hecht)
13. You Don't Know Me (Eddie Arnold, Cindy Walker)
14. Put It Off Until Tomorrow featuring Loretta Lynn and Peggy Sue (Dolly Parton, Bill Owens)
15. I Cried The Blue (Right Out of My Eyes)

Gayle has 20 number one country hits, six albums certified Gold by the RIAA and was the first female artist in country music history to reach platinum sales with her 1977 album, "We Must Believe in Magic." She was the CMA's "Female Vocalist of the Year" for two consecutive years and won a GrammyvAward Winner for "Best Female Vocal Performance" for "Brown Eyes."

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