Sign up for newsletter
 

Rucker rides "Wagon Wheel" to 8x Platinum

Thursday, February 13, 2020 – Darius Rucker was surprised with a plaque celebrating the RIAA's recent 8x-Platinum certification of his hit song "Wagon Wheel" during a visit to the Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum yesterday.

Since topping the charts for back-to-back weeks in 2013, "Wagon Wheel" has now become one of the top five best-selling country songs of all time. Rucker is now the only solo male country act to achieve the honor of an 8x-plus multi-Platinum song in RIAA's history.

Lured under the pretense of seeing his exhibit at the museum, Rucker was surprised when he rounded the corner to see his record label of 14-plus years, UMG Nashville, holding a plaque. "What are y'all doing here?" Rucker said, taking in the presence of label heads and industry guests from the RIAA gathered around his exhibit, which features the suit he wore in the "Wagon Wheel" music video alongside other memorabilia from his career.

After hearing the news - and pausing to really read the plaque's

inscription, Rucker added, "I don't believe you. I don't believe this. Wow, what a testament to the fans and their love of country music."

"Wagon Wheel," originally released by Old Crow Medicine Show in 2004, was written by the band's lead singer, Ketch Secor, and was based on a sketch by Bob Dylan, who is credited as a co-writer. The single was featured on Rucker's Gold-certified, chart topping album "True Believers." "Wagon Wheel" also won a GRAMMY for Best Country Solo Performance at the 56th Annual GRAMMY Awards, the third of Rucker's career.

"Even in my wildest dreams for 'Wagon Wheel,' the singer was never me or Bob," said Secor upon learning of the song's new accolade. "It could have been a lot of different people who had the big hit with it. It could have been one of those perfect-smile guys with the made-for-TV personalities. That it was instead a salt of the earth singer like Darius is something divine I'll leave to the theologians to figure out."

Mike Dungan, UMGN Chairman & CEO, recalled the conversation he had with Rucker when he first decided to record the song: "Darius called my cell phone one night and told me that he was in the audience for the talent show at his daughter's high school. He said, 'Hey man, do you know that song 'Wagon Wheel?' I just watched a band full of kids perform it, and it reminded me of how great that song is, and I want to cut it.' I said, 'you're crazy,' to which he said, 'well I'm cuttin' it. I'll talk to you later.' We (the label) thought that this was going to either be huge... or a disaster. He was right, everybody's happy, life is good."

"On behalf of RIAA, we're so pleased to mark such an amazing accomplishment," said Jackie Jones, Vice President of Industry Relations at the Recording Industry Association of America. "A certification of this magnitude is incredibly rare-occurring only a few times in our organization's history."

More news for Darius Rucker

CD reviews for Darius Rucker

When Was the Last Time CD review - When Was the Last Time
Darius Rucker is so darn likeable, he likely gets away with creating subpar music more than most. However, "When Was the Last Time" is a consistently good album, which is as respectable as it is likeable. Rucker knows how to sing crowd pleasers, like the fun and funny "Count the Beers" and the all-star collaboration "Straight to Hell," which also features Jason Aldean, Luke Bryan and Charles Kelley. He shines brightest, though, on the more serious songs. »»»
Southern Style CD review - Southern Style
Although opener "Homegrown Honey" has a few hip-hip sonic elements fueling it, "Southern Style" is a fairly traditional - well, as traditional as Darius Rucker can get - album. "Homegrown Honey," along with the title cut and "Half Full Dixie Cup," make a play for Rucker's Southern credentials, and for the most part support these claims. Rucker is an easygoing vocalist, and this latest effort goes down smoothly. It's still taboo for country »»»
Home for the Holidays CD review - Home for the Holidays
When it came time for Darius Rucker to throw his hat into the holiday album ring, he was clearly aiming for the old school, traditional realm of such things. The heavy orchestration for these 12 songs hearkens back to the days when crooners like Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra tracked Christmas projects, rather than anything that might pass for country. With that said, though, Rucker represents himself quite well with this traditional album of (mostly) familiar Christmas songs. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Tillis unlocks "Looking for a Feeling" "It had been a while since I'd given my fans any new solo music," Pam Tillis explains, when asked about the motivation behind recording her album "Looking for a Feeling." Until recently, Tillis mostly busied herself by recording and touring with... »»»
Hull takes "25 Trips" Sierra Hull would be the first to tell you that releasing a new CD in the teeth of a global pandemic is a challenge. "It's very strange...just adjusting to being home and knowing what that feels like. It's the most I've... »»»
Lewis (and her daughters) make beautiful music (occasionally) and carry on the legacy Linda Gail Lewis has several interesting bullet points on her lengthy resume. She released her first singles in 1963 at age 16, and her first solo album, "The Two Sides of Linda Gail Lewis," in 1969 when she was just 22; her follow up album wouldn't appear... »»»
Neon Cross CD review - Neon Cross
Many records are touted as inspiring, but few albums actually live up to that billing by actually striking sentiments worthy of universal appeal. In Jaime Wyatt's case, there's never any doubt, »»»
Ghosts of West Virginia CD review - Ghosts of West Virginia
In a time when political views are pushing us further apart as a society, Steve Earle is one of the few artists reaching across that divide to seek common ground. In the case of his album, "Ghosts »»»
Tessy Lou Williams CD review - Tessy Lou Williams
Welcome country traditionalist Tessy Lou Williams who hails from Montana, the daughter of two musicians who emigrated from Nashville to Willow Creek, Mont. (population 210). Her parents toured with their »»»
Ready for the Horses CD review - Ready for the Horses
"It ain't for the faint of heart," Jarrod Dickenson croons on the lead-off track on "Ready the Horses," a rallying cry meant to inspire the reticent among us in this era of distrust »»»
Songs I Can't Live Without CD review - Songs I Can't Live Without
After a seven-year hiatus, Marshall Chapman is back with "Songs I Can't Live Without," her 14th release and eighth on her own label. The 71-year-old singer-songwriter-author-actress had intended to retire from music »»»
Copy That CD review - Copy That
Nine songs in, Sara Evans finally unleashes a country song that she wanted to cover. And it's one of the most copied songs at that - Hank's "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry." The cut is a decided left turn from the rest »»»