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Bare, Ford, Lynne, Doleac, Burch drop new sounds (sort of)

Friday, April 17, 2020 – Bobby Bare is 85 and a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, and he is going back in time - way back - to release a new album. "Great American Saturday Night" is out today despite being decades in the making. He recorded the disc at RCA's Studio B in Nashville in the late 1970s, cutting mainly Shel Silverstein songs, but the disc never saw the light of day. Until now.

Colt Ford also goes back - to his 2010 release "Chicken and Biscuits." "He's now out with Chicken And Biscuits (Second Helping)," an expanded version of his sophomore release. The 20-song collection contains six new tracks with remixes and live versions of other songs. Included are Ford's breakthrough love song, "Chicken and Biscuits" with James Otto; the rocking party anthem, "Hey Ya'll" featuring Randy Houser; "Cricket On A Line" featuring Rhett Akins; and "Hip Hop in a Honky Tonk" with Kevin Fowler.

Shelby Lynne released her first disc in five years, a self-titled affair with the emphasis on her voice. The songs tend to be spare musically and on the heavy side.

Adam Doleac makes his label debut with "Famous," a six-song EP. The release was co-produced by Jason Gantt ("SOLO"), Lindsay Rimes ("Whiskey's Fine") and Andy Skib ("Famous," "I Choose Lonely," "Mom and Daddy's Money"). The Hattiesburg, Miss. native received a scholarship to the University of Southern Mississippi where he not only played baseball, but wrote songs with his teammates and learned to play guitar. After he began playing hometown gigs, Doleac posted a performance of one of his songs on YouTube. The visual caught the attention of Sony/ATV Music Publishing. Doleac has co-penned songs recorded by Kane Brown, Darius Rucker, and Hootie and the Blowfish.

Veteran singer Paul Burch is back with the WPA Ballclub for "Light Sensitive," which he recorded in Nashville. While Burch has recorded more straightahead country discs, "Light Sensitive" is multi-genre and more in the Americana potpourri. Luther Dickinson, Robyn Hitchcock, Amy Rigby and Aaron Lee Tasjan guest on the 12-song release.

More news for Bobby Bare

CD reviews for Bobby Bare

Great American Saturday Night CD review - Great American Saturday Night
In many ways, revered country singer, multiple Grammy nominee and Country Music Hall of Fame member Bobby Bare and author and songwriter Shel Silverstein can claim a shared legacy. Bare established himself as a determined insurgent, who, over the course of a nearly 60 year career, set the stage for the outlaw country crowd that followed. Silverstein wrote any number of quirky and comical songs that became hits for a disparate number of popular artists, from Dr. Hook to Johnny Cash, and Belinda »»»
Things Change CD review - Things Change
Hipsters may only consider checking out Bobby Bare's "Things Change" due to the participation of hot item Chris Stapleton, who sings on a remake of the old hit "Detroit City." Hopefully, though, they'll immediately recognize Bare's immense talent and stick around for the whole shooting match. Bare's no spring chicken anymore, but he sounds extremely good throughout this classic-sounding country effort. Bare's singing voice may not be a thing of country »»»
Darker Than Light CD review - Darker Than Light
For this album, Bare picks a playlist of 16 longtime favorites ranging from traditional folk songs to recent hits. The ones that work the best are the classics. Bare's husky baritone and truck driver-friendly delivery are perfect for the Woody Guthrie classic Going Down The Road Felling Bad and the loping Boll Weevil, a tune he learned from Tex Ritter back in the 1950's. Farewell Angelina, a Dylan tune made famous by Joan Baez, is delighfully simple, a thoughtful interpretation steeped »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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