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Jamey Johnson, Macs Davis and McAnally win awards

Wednesday, March 10, 2010 – Jamey Johnson, Mac Davis and Mac McAnally won awards Wednesday from the Alabama Music Hall.

They will be inducted with four others during the 13th Induction Banquet and Awards Show in Montgomery, Ala., Thursday, March 25.

Johnson will receive the Alabama's Rising Star Award category. Johnson, who was born in Enterprise and grew up in Montgomery, co-wrote the Country Music Association and Academy of Country Music 2007 Song of the Year Give It Away, recorded by George Strait. The Grammy-nominated artist won the ACM's and CMA's Song of the Year for his single In Color.

The Jerry Wexler Award will go to former Muscle Shoals recording artist Davis, of Los Angeles. Davis is a songwriter who found success as a recording artist with Rick Hall as his producer at Fame in Muscle Shoals. Among their hits were Baby, Don't Get Hooked On Me, Stop And Smell The Roses, Texas In My Rear View Mirror and Hooked on Music. In 1974, Davis was named the Academy of Country Music's Entertainer of the Year.

The Arthur Alexander songwriter's award will go to singer/songwriter Mac McAnally, of Sheffield. McAnally, a Red Bay native who grew up in Belmont, Miss., has won numerous awards for his songwriting. He writes and tours with Jimmy Buffett, whom he also produces.

Others receiving honors will be:

Alabama Music Hall of Fame inductee: Performing artist/group category - The Blind Boys of Alabama and Eddie Levert, (the lead singer of the O'Jays.)

Alabama Music Hall of Fame inductee: Music creator - Dothan songwriter/record producer Buddy Buie and Florence session musician Jerry Carrigan

Entertainment industry - record producer/musician Paul Hornsby

John Herbert Orr Pioneer Award - the late Muscle Shoals musician Terry Thompson and singer/Colbert-Lauderdale County State Senator Bobby Denton.

Governor's award - B. A. Nugent, of Point Clear.

Music industry award - Integrity, Inc. chief executive officer Michael Coleman, of Mobile.

Sam Phillips innovator's award - Concert promoter Tony Ruffino, of Birmingham.

Media award - Original MTV veejay Alan Hunter, of Birmingham.

More news for Jamey Johnson

CD reviews for Jamey Johnson

Living for a Song: A Tribute to Hank Cochran CD review - Living for a Song: A Tribute to Hank Cochran
When ace country songwriter Hank Cochran died in the summer of 2010 it didn't take long to establish who could pull off a fitting tribute to the man who penned timeless classics like Eddy Arnold's Make the World Go Away and Patsy Cline's I Fall to Pieces. Country outlaw Jamey Johnson, who had bonded with Cochran during his final years battling pancreatic cancer, stepped up to the challenge. And boy, has he delivered. Rounding up the likes of Willie Nelson, Alison Krauss, Merle »»»
That Lonesome Song CD review - That Lonesome Song
The beginning of Jamey Johnson's second CD has little to do with today's typical country fare. The sound of footsteps are heard with someone telling him, "Mr. Johnson...you're free to do whateve r you want to do. Just stay out of trouble." He's leaving jail, but maybe the jail was the handcuffs he may have felt in life, including musically, because his semi-hit, "The Dollar," did not prepare listeners for this. The Alabama native gets mighty personal on »»»
The Dollar CD review - The Dollar
Jamey Johnson counts traditional country, new country and southern rock among his influences, and the Alabama native melds them together in a unique way with special emphasis on traditional sounds on his 11-song debut album. Johnson is a great storyteller, whether that song is going to cause laughter or tears depends on one's perspective. The self-titled track is about a family spending time together, written from the child's perspective while "Flying Silver Eagle" is a tale of a superficial »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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