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Blind Boys of Alabama change directions, go country (gospel)

Friday, February 18, 2011 – Five time Grammy Award and Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award winners The Blind Boys of Alabama will change directions and go country. Make that traditional country-gospel album for the first time in their 70-year career with a new CD out on May 3rd on Saguaro Road Records.

Jamey Johnson co-produced the album and performs on it along with Vince Gill, Willie Nelson, Hank Williams Jr., Lee Ann Womack and The Oak Ridge Boys.

"There wasn't one person who didn't bawl like a baby or bust their heart open at least once," Johnson told the New York Times recently.

"It's been a dream of mine to do a country gospel album and we couldn't have found a better partner than Jamey" said Jimmy Carter, the last original Blind Boy still touring with the band. "This album beautifully combines two of the seminal roots of the American music tree, gospel and country music."

The concept started with Carter's longstanding love of country and his desire to do a traditional country-tinged gospel album. Last year, his idea started to take shape when the Blind Boys were asked to curate a series of shows at the Lincoln Center Festival in New York.

One of the sold-out nights featured Ralph Stanley, Ray Benson (Asleep At The Wheel) and Allison Moorer. Soon after, they met Johnson and asked him to join them in singing the traditional song Down By The Riverside at the Alabama Music Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

The band had already been planning to make a country record with their production collaborator Chris Goldsmith, who had enlisted the help of veteran Nashville drummer Chad Cromwell (Neil Young, Mark Knopfler). Johnson then brought in bassist Kevin 'Swine' Grantt (Brad Paisley, Daryl Worley) and guitarist Reggie Young.

Among the songs are Hank Jr.'s re-working of his father's I Saw the Light. The disc was recorded live in just a few days at Ben Folds' Javelina Studio.

More news for Jamey Johnson

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That Lonesome Song CD review - That Lonesome Song
The beginning of Jamey Johnson's second CD has little to do with today's typical country fare. The sound of footsteps are heard with someone telling him, "Mr. Johnson...you're free to do whateve r you want to do. Just stay out of trouble." He's leaving jail, but maybe the jail was the handcuffs he may have felt in life, including musically, because his semi-hit, "The Dollar," did not prepare listeners for this. The Alabama native gets mighty personal on »»»
The Dollar CD review - The Dollar
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Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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